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Reflections on the Origins of the Polis: An Economic Perspective on Institutional Change in Ancient Greece

Lyttkens, Carl Hampus LU (2006) In Constitutional Political Economy 17(1). p.31-48
Abstract
From a beginning of small isolated settlements around 1000 B.C., the city-state (polis) emerged in Greece in the course of four centuries as a political, geographical and judicial unit, with an assembly, council, magistrates and written laws. Using a rational-actor perspective, it is shown how this process was driven by competition among the members of the elite. A crucial ingredient was the gradual consolidation of boundaries, which contributed to population growth, inter-state conflicts, colonisation and competition for power. Variations over time in the conditions for competition explain both the introduction of formal political institutions and their overthrow by tyrants.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Institutional change, Ancient Greece, City-state, Competition
in
Constitutional Political Economy
volume
17
issue
1
pages
31 - 48
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:33646693866
ISSN
1043-4062
DOI
10.1007/s10602-006-6792-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
215dbe22-5cd5-4033-8f97-236344d0b146 (old id 1384536)
date added to LUP
2009-04-20 12:27:13
date last changed
2019-10-13 03:31:41
@article{215dbe22-5cd5-4033-8f97-236344d0b146,
  abstract     = {From a beginning of small isolated settlements around 1000 B.C., the city-state (polis) emerged in Greece in the course of four centuries as a political, geographical and judicial unit, with an assembly, council, magistrates and written laws. Using a rational-actor perspective, it is shown how this process was driven by competition among the members of the elite. A crucial ingredient was the gradual consolidation of boundaries, which contributed to population growth, inter-state conflicts, colonisation and competition for power. Variations over time in the conditions for competition explain both the introduction of formal political institutions and their overthrow by tyrants.},
  author       = {Lyttkens, Carl Hampus},
  issn         = {1043-4062},
  keyword      = {Institutional change,Ancient Greece,City-state,Competition},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {31--48},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Constitutional Political Economy},
  title        = {Reflections on the Origins of the Polis: An Economic Perspective on Institutional Change in Ancient Greece},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10602-006-6792-z},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2006},
}