Advanced

Medical education in Sweden.

Lindgren, Stefan LU ; Brännström, Thomas; Hanse, Eric; Ledin, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Gunnar LU ; Sandler, Stellan; Tidefelt, Ulf and Donnér, Jakob LU (2011) In Medical Teacher 33(10). p.798-803
Abstract
Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the... (More)
Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Teacher
volume
33
issue
10
pages
798 - 803
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000295218300010
  • pmid:21942478
  • scopus:80053226978
ISSN
0142-159X
DOI
10.3109/0142159X.2011.570816
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ed5879d2-57f9-4963-898f-3456c1b3dad8 (old id 2168476)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21942478?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-10-03 13:58:10
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:09:17
@article{ed5879d2-57f9-4963-898f-3456c1b3dad8,
  abstract     = {Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.},
  author       = {Lindgren, Stefan and Brännström, Thomas and Hanse, Eric and Ledin, Torbjörn and Nilsson, Gunnar and Sandler, Stellan and Tidefelt, Ulf and Donnér, Jakob},
  issn         = {0142-159X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {798--803},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Medical Teacher},
  title        = {Medical education in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/0142159X.2011.570816},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2011},
}