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Psychometric properties of an insomnia-specific measure of worry: The Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire

Jansson-Fröjmark, Marcus; Harvey, Allison; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU ; Norell-Clarke, Annika and Linton, Steven (2011) In Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 40. p.65-76
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire (APSQ), with a focus on factorial validity and internal consistency as well as discriminative, convergent, and association with sleep parameters and daytime impairment. Among a randomly selected sample from the general population (N = 5,000), 2,333 participants completed a survey on nighttime symptoms, daytime symptoms, health outcomes, and psychological processes. The study sample consisted of 1800 participants who did not fulfill criteria for another sleep disorder than insomnia. A two-factor solution, accounting for 70.7% of the variance, was extracted from the 10 APSQ items. One six-item factor determined worries... (More)
The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire (APSQ), with a focus on factorial validity and internal consistency as well as discriminative, convergent, and association with sleep parameters and daytime impairment. Among a randomly selected sample from the general population (N = 5,000), 2,333 participants completed a survey on nighttime symptoms, daytime symptoms, health outcomes, and psychological processes. The study sample consisted of 1800 participants who did not fulfill criteria for another sleep disorder than insomnia. A two-factor solution, accounting for 70.7% of the variance, was extracted from the 10 APSQ items. One six-item factor determined worries about the consequences of poor sleep (a = .91); the second factor, with four items, assessed worries about the uncontrollability of sleep (a = .86). The two factors were significantly intercorrelated (r = .65)and significantly associated with the total APSQ (rs = .97 and .76, respectively). The APSQ and the two subscales showed discriminant validity between three sleep status groups (normal sleep, poor sleep, and insomnia disorder; R2 = .33–.41). The APSQ and the subscales demonstrated convergent

validity with measures on cognitive arousal, sleep-related beliefs, anxiety, and depression. They also were significantly correlated with sleep parameters and daytime impairment. The findings suggest that the APSQ is a psychometrically sound instrument for assessing worry in insomnia. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
volume
40
pages
65 - 76
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:79951789228
ISSN
1651-2316
DOI
10.1080/16506073.2010.538432
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bb022269-a09e-4d63-86b8-b99d679766b8 (old id 2172870)
date added to LUP
2011-11-01 14:15:31
date last changed
2017-06-18 04:53:28
@article{bb022269-a09e-4d63-86b8-b99d679766b8,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire (APSQ), with a focus on factorial validity and internal consistency as well as discriminative, convergent, and association with sleep parameters and daytime impairment. Among a randomly selected sample from the general population (N = 5,000), 2,333 participants completed a survey on nighttime symptoms, daytime symptoms, health outcomes, and psychological processes. The study sample consisted of 1800 participants who did not fulfill criteria for another sleep disorder than insomnia. A two-factor solution, accounting for 70.7% of the variance, was extracted from the 10 APSQ items. One six-item factor determined worries about the consequences of poor sleep (a = .91); the second factor, with four items, assessed worries about the uncontrollability of sleep (a = .86). The two factors were significantly intercorrelated (r = .65)and significantly associated with the total APSQ (rs = .97 and .76, respectively). The APSQ and the two subscales showed discriminant validity between three sleep status groups (normal sleep, poor sleep, and insomnia disorder; R2 = .33–.41). The APSQ and the subscales demonstrated convergent<br/><br>
validity with measures on cognitive arousal, sleep-related beliefs, anxiety, and depression. They also were significantly correlated with sleep parameters and daytime impairment. The findings suggest that the APSQ is a psychometrically sound instrument for assessing worry in insomnia.},
  author       = {Jansson-Fröjmark, Marcus and Harvey, Allison and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Norell-Clarke, Annika and Linton, Steven},
  issn         = {1651-2316},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {65--76},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognitive Behaviour Therapy},
  title        = {Psychometric properties of an insomnia-specific measure of worry: The Anxiety and Preoccupation about Sleep Questionnaire},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16506073.2010.538432},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2011},
}