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Muscle Sizes and Moment Arms of Rotator Cuff Muscles Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Finsen, Lotte; Eriksson, Joakim LU ; Johansson, Gerd LU ; Ståhlberg, Freddy LU and Ekdahl, C (2000) In Cells Tissues Organs 167. p.214-222
Abstract
Biomechanical models which require information on, e.g., joint torque and muscle force are useful in the estimation of when and how mechanical overload of the musculoskeletal system may lead to disorders. The aim was to study the reliability and validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify muscle sizes and moment arms by MRI and to test selected anthropometric measures as predictors of muscle sizes and moment arms. A total of 20 healthy Scandinavian women (age 22–58 years) participated in an MRI scanning of their dominant shoulder. With a PC-based program the reliability and the validity of the MRI measurements was estimated to be high, and mean anatomical cross-sectional areas (ACSA) and muscle lengths were measured to be 4.0,... (More)
Biomechanical models which require information on, e.g., joint torque and muscle force are useful in the estimation of when and how mechanical overload of the musculoskeletal system may lead to disorders. The aim was to study the reliability and validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify muscle sizes and moment arms by MRI and to test selected anthropometric measures as predictors of muscle sizes and moment arms. A total of 20 healthy Scandinavian women (age 22–58 years) participated in an MRI scanning of their dominant shoulder. With a PC-based program the reliability and the validity of the MRI measurements was estimated to be high, and mean anatomical cross-sectional areas (ACSA) and muscle lengths were measured to be 4.0, 9.8 and 12.1 cm2 and 12.0, 12.6 and 12.8 cm for m. supraspinatus, m. infraspinatus and m. subscapularis, respectively. Volumes were calculated to be 48.8, 125.1 and 153.6 cm3. Moment arms were measured with the upper arm in a neutral position and in a functional position of 34° abduction for m. supraspinatus only, and were 2.4 and 2.6 cm. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and its fiber force component were estimated from dissected fiber length and pennation angle. MRI volume and PCSA were 1.4–1.7 times higher than dissection data, primarily because of age differences. No external anthropometric measures were found to be predictors of volumes or moment arms. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
rotator cuff muscles, moment arms, muscle size, magnetic resonance imaging, anthropometry
in
Cells Tissues Organs
volume
167
pages
214 - 222
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0033818341
ISSN
1422-6405
DOI
10.1159/000016784
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
609a48ac-a3e2-4696-a6f8-d26560339ca6 (old id 2173580)
date added to LUP
2011-10-12 17:29:40
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:59:32
@article{609a48ac-a3e2-4696-a6f8-d26560339ca6,
  abstract     = {Biomechanical models which require information on, e.g., joint torque and muscle force are useful in the estimation of when and how mechanical overload of the musculoskeletal system may lead to disorders. The aim was to study the reliability and validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify muscle sizes and moment arms by MRI and to test selected anthropometric measures as predictors of muscle sizes and moment arms. A total of 20 healthy Scandinavian women (age 22–58 years) participated in an MRI scanning of their dominant shoulder. With a PC-based program the reliability and the validity of the MRI measurements was estimated to be high, and mean anatomical cross-sectional areas (ACSA) and muscle lengths were measured to be 4.0, 9.8 and 12.1 cm2 and 12.0, 12.6 and 12.8 cm for m. supraspinatus, m. infraspinatus and m. subscapularis, respectively. Volumes were calculated to be 48.8, 125.1 and 153.6 cm3. Moment arms were measured with the upper arm in a neutral position and in a functional position of 34° abduction for m. supraspinatus only, and were 2.4 and 2.6 cm. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and its fiber force component were estimated from dissected fiber length and pennation angle. MRI volume and PCSA were 1.4–1.7 times higher than dissection data, primarily because of age differences. No external anthropometric measures were found to be predictors of volumes or moment arms.},
  author       = {Juul-Kristensen, Birgit and Bojsen-Møller, Finn and Finsen, Lotte and Eriksson, Joakim and Johansson, Gerd and Ståhlberg, Freddy and Ekdahl, C},
  issn         = {1422-6405},
  keyword      = {rotator cuff muscles,moment arms,muscle size,magnetic resonance imaging,anthropometry},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {214--222},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Cells Tissues Organs},
  title        = {Muscle Sizes and Moment Arms of Rotator Cuff Muscles Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000016784},
  volume       = {167},
  year         = {2000},
}