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Neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer mortality: a multilevel analysis from Sweden.

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Sundquist, Jan LU (2012) In Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases 15. p.128-134
Abstract
Background:The objective was to analyze the association between neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer mortality, after adjusting for individual characteristics.Methods:This study was designed as a follow-up study of prostate cancer mortality between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008 in patients aged 25-74 years (a total of 73 159 patients). Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed with individual-level characteristics at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation at the second level.Results:The age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rate was 1.5 times higher in men living in high-deprivation neighborhoods than in those living in the most affluent neighborhoods. Mortality rates were also associated with... (More)
Background:The objective was to analyze the association between neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer mortality, after adjusting for individual characteristics.Methods:This study was designed as a follow-up study of prostate cancer mortality between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008 in patients aged 25-74 years (a total of 73 159 patients). Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed with individual-level characteristics at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation at the second level.Results:The age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rate was 1.5 times higher in men living in high-deprivation neighborhoods than in those living in the most affluent neighborhoods. Mortality rates were also associated with certain individual-level characteristics, that is, age, marital status, family income, educational attainment, immigration status, urban/rural status, mobility and comorbidity. For example, there was a strong relationship between prostate cancer mortality and being unmarried, having a low income or educational attainment, and hospitalization for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the full model, the risk of prostate cancer mortality was 25% higher in men living in the most deprived neighborhoods than in those living in the most affluent neighborhoods.Conclusions:High level of neighborhood deprivation independently predicts prostate cancer mortality. This raises important clinical and public health concerns. Both individual- and neighborhood-level approaches are important in healthcare policies.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038/pcan.2011.46. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
volume
15
pages
128 - 134
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000304044300003
  • pmid:21986984
  • scopus:84861226401
ISSN
1476-5608
DOI
10.1038/pcan.2011.46
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
537d11de-6b57-43d9-8759-100f7a238400 (old id 2200643)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21986984?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-11-02 09:26:00
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:23:18
@article{537d11de-6b57-43d9-8759-100f7a238400,
  abstract     = {Background:The objective was to analyze the association between neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer mortality, after adjusting for individual characteristics.Methods:This study was designed as a follow-up study of prostate cancer mortality between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2008 in patients aged 25-74 years (a total of 73 159 patients). Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed with individual-level characteristics at the first level and level of neighborhood deprivation at the second level.Results:The age-standardized prostate cancer mortality rate was 1.5 times higher in men living in high-deprivation neighborhoods than in those living in the most affluent neighborhoods. Mortality rates were also associated with certain individual-level characteristics, that is, age, marital status, family income, educational attainment, immigration status, urban/rural status, mobility and comorbidity. For example, there was a strong relationship between prostate cancer mortality and being unmarried, having a low income or educational attainment, and hospitalization for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the full model, the risk of prostate cancer mortality was 25% higher in men living in the most deprived neighborhoods than in those living in the most affluent neighborhoods.Conclusions:High level of neighborhood deprivation independently predicts prostate cancer mortality. This raises important clinical and public health concerns. Both individual- and neighborhood-level approaches are important in healthcare policies.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038/pcan.2011.46.},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan},
  issn         = {1476-5608},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {128--134},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases},
  title        = {Neighborhood deprivation and prostate cancer mortality: a multilevel analysis from Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/pcan.2011.46},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2012},
}