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Measurements of wound edge microvascular blood flow during negative pressure wound therapy using thermodiffusion and transcutaneous and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry

Borgquist, Ola LU ; Anesater, Erik; Hedström, Erik LU ; Lee, Charles K.; Ingemansson, Richard LU and Malmsjö, Malin LU (2011) In Wound Repair and Regeneration 19(6). p.727-733
Abstract
The effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on wound edge microvascular blood flow are not clear. The aim of the present study was therefore to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on periwound blood flow in a porcine peripheral wound model using different blood flow measurement techniques. NPWT at -20, -40, -80, and -125 mmHg was applied to a peripheral porcine wound (n = 8). Thermodiffusion, transcutaneous, and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the blood perfusion 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm from the wound edge. Thermodiffusion (an invasive measurement technique) generally showed a decrease in perfusion close to the wound edge (0.5 cm), and an increase further from the edge (2.5 cm). Invasive laser Doppler... (More)
The effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on wound edge microvascular blood flow are not clear. The aim of the present study was therefore to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on periwound blood flow in a porcine peripheral wound model using different blood flow measurement techniques. NPWT at -20, -40, -80, and -125 mmHg was applied to a peripheral porcine wound (n = 8). Thermodiffusion, transcutaneous, and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the blood perfusion 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm from the wound edge. Thermodiffusion (an invasive measurement technique) generally showed a decrease in perfusion close to the wound edge (0.5 cm), and an increase further from the edge (2.5 cm). Invasive laser Doppler velocimetry showed a similar response pattern, with a decrease in blood flow 0.5 cm from the wound edge and an increase further away. However, 1.0 cm from the wound edge blood flow decreased with high pressure levels and increased with low pressure levels. A different response pattern was seen with transcutaneous laser Doppler velocimetry, showing an increase in blood flow regardless of the distance from the wound edge (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm). During NPWT, both increases and decreases in blood flow can be seen in the periwound tissue depending on the distance from the wound edge and the pressure level. The pattern of response depends partly on the measurement technique used. The combination of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion caused by NPWT may accelerate wound healing. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Wound Repair and Regeneration
volume
19
issue
6
pages
727 - 733
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000296480900009
  • pmid:22092843
  • scopus:80155141593
ISSN
1524-475X
DOI
10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00741.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d8e040b8-7f35-4342-a932-390d1dc9836d (old id 2206506)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22092843?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-11-30 09:12:18
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:09:43
@article{d8e040b8-7f35-4342-a932-390d1dc9836d,
  abstract     = {The effects of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on wound edge microvascular blood flow are not clear. The aim of the present study was therefore to further elucidate the effects of NPWT on periwound blood flow in a porcine peripheral wound model using different blood flow measurement techniques. NPWT at -20, -40, -80, and -125 mmHg was applied to a peripheral porcine wound (n = 8). Thermodiffusion, transcutaneous, and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the blood perfusion 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm from the wound edge. Thermodiffusion (an invasive measurement technique) generally showed a decrease in perfusion close to the wound edge (0.5 cm), and an increase further from the edge (2.5 cm). Invasive laser Doppler velocimetry showed a similar response pattern, with a decrease in blood flow 0.5 cm from the wound edge and an increase further away. However, 1.0 cm from the wound edge blood flow decreased with high pressure levels and increased with low pressure levels. A different response pattern was seen with transcutaneous laser Doppler velocimetry, showing an increase in blood flow regardless of the distance from the wound edge (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 cm). During NPWT, both increases and decreases in blood flow can be seen in the periwound tissue depending on the distance from the wound edge and the pressure level. The pattern of response depends partly on the measurement technique used. The combination of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion caused by NPWT may accelerate wound healing.},
  author       = {Borgquist, Ola and Anesater, Erik and Hedström, Erik and Lee, Charles K. and Ingemansson, Richard and Malmsjö, Malin},
  issn         = {1524-475X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {727--733},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Wound Repair and Regeneration},
  title        = {Measurements of wound edge microvascular blood flow during negative pressure wound therapy using thermodiffusion and transcutaneous and invasive laser Doppler velocimetry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1524-475X.2011.00741.x},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2011},
}