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A pollen record of the last 450 years from a lowland peat bog on Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic, implying early anthropogenic influence

Ljung, Karl LU and Björck, Svante LU (2011) In Journal of Quaternary Science 26(7). p.688-693
Abstract
A pollen diagram from a small peat bog on the island of Tristan da Cunha in the central South Atlantic (37 degrees 05'S, 12 degrees 17'W) is presented. The pollen diagram contains data from both introduced and native plant taxa. The earliest pollen grains from introduced Plantago lanceolata are dated to around AD 1570, and probably represent unintentional introductions of weeds by the earliest Portuguese explorers visiting the islands. After AD 1600, a greater abundance of pollen from introduced plants and declining tree pollen values indicate opening of the lowland vegetation and more intense land use, probably attributable to the effect of seasonal seal and whale hunters. After AD 1800, evidence of increased erosion and more intense land... (More)
A pollen diagram from a small peat bog on the island of Tristan da Cunha in the central South Atlantic (37 degrees 05'S, 12 degrees 17'W) is presented. The pollen diagram contains data from both introduced and native plant taxa. The earliest pollen grains from introduced Plantago lanceolata are dated to around AD 1570, and probably represent unintentional introductions of weeds by the earliest Portuguese explorers visiting the islands. After AD 1600, a greater abundance of pollen from introduced plants and declining tree pollen values indicate opening of the lowland vegetation and more intense land use, probably attributable to the effect of seasonal seal and whale hunters. After AD 1800, evidence of increased erosion and more intense land use are inferred from the pollen diagram, reflecting permanent settlement. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
human impact, palaeoecology, pollen analysis, peat, Tristan da Cunha
in
Journal of Quaternary Science
volume
26
issue
7
pages
688 - 693
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000296091300003
  • scopus:80053207211
ISSN
1099-1417
DOI
10.1002/jqs.1489
project
MERGE
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c52bc567-3334-4cb7-b91f-c992cac32f22 (old id 2208209)
date added to LUP
2011-11-28 09:38:16
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:15:49
@article{c52bc567-3334-4cb7-b91f-c992cac32f22,
  abstract     = {A pollen diagram from a small peat bog on the island of Tristan da Cunha in the central South Atlantic (37 degrees 05'S, 12 degrees 17'W) is presented. The pollen diagram contains data from both introduced and native plant taxa. The earliest pollen grains from introduced Plantago lanceolata are dated to around AD 1570, and probably represent unintentional introductions of weeds by the earliest Portuguese explorers visiting the islands. After AD 1600, a greater abundance of pollen from introduced plants and declining tree pollen values indicate opening of the lowland vegetation and more intense land use, probably attributable to the effect of seasonal seal and whale hunters. After AD 1800, evidence of increased erosion and more intense land use are inferred from the pollen diagram, reflecting permanent settlement. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Ljung, Karl and Björck, Svante},
  issn         = {1099-1417},
  keyword      = {human impact,palaeoecology,pollen analysis,peat,Tristan da Cunha},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {688--693},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Quaternary Science},
  title        = {A pollen record of the last 450 years from a lowland peat bog on Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic, implying early anthropogenic influence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.1489},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}