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Driving to Learn in a powered wheelchair: Inter-rater reliability of a tool for assessment of joystick-use.

Nilsson, Lisbeth LU ; Eklund, Mona LU and Nyberg, Per LU (2011) In Australian Occupational Therapy Journal 58(6). p.447-454
Abstract
Background/aim: People with profound cognitive disabilities are not expected to learn powered mobility use. The Driving to Learn project focussed on what this population could achieve from practising in a joystick-operated powered wheelchair. By means of using grounded theory methodology an eight-phase process 'growing consciousness of joystick-use' was identified. In addition, a tool for assessment of actual phase of joystick-use and facilitating strategies for each phase emerged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool. Methods: The first author (LN) selected 24 video-sequences within the video data collected in the project. Each of the eight phases in the identified process were... (More)
Background/aim: People with profound cognitive disabilities are not expected to learn powered mobility use. The Driving to Learn project focussed on what this population could achieve from practising in a joystick-operated powered wheelchair. By means of using grounded theory methodology an eight-phase process 'growing consciousness of joystick-use' was identified. In addition, a tool for assessment of actual phase of joystick-use and facilitating strategies for each phase emerged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool. Methods: The first author (LN) selected 24 video-sequences within the video data collected in the project. Each of the eight phases in the identified process were represented by three video-clips. The video-clips ranged in length between two to five minutes. LN's ratings served as criterion rating against which three independent raters' judgements were compared. The three raters were all occupational therapists, and two were experienced with the Driving to Learn™ method, powered wheelchair provision and the target population; and one was inexperienced. Results: When comparing the three raters' assessments with that of LN (N = 72), the calculation gave a weighted kappa value of 0.85. All raters judged the tool as having a high degree of usability for assessing phases of joystick-use. Minimal differences were found between the experienced and inexperienced raters. Conclusion and significance of the study: The inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool was very good. The findings indicate that the tool is reliable and has clinical usability in occupational therapy practice. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
volume
58
issue
6
pages
447 - 454
publisher
Australian Association of occupational therapists
external identifiers
  • WOS:000297328800008
  • PMID:22111647
  • Scopus:82255194357
ISSN
1440-1630
DOI
10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.00983.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cc12a895-fea2-4c38-ac44-cc2894b3a8eb (old id 2220448)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22111647?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-12-03 09:41:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:47:35
@article{cc12a895-fea2-4c38-ac44-cc2894b3a8eb,
  abstract     = {Background/aim: People with profound cognitive disabilities are not expected to learn powered mobility use. The Driving to Learn project focussed on what this population could achieve from practising in a joystick-operated powered wheelchair. By means of using grounded theory methodology an eight-phase process 'growing consciousness of joystick-use' was identified. In addition, a tool for assessment of actual phase of joystick-use and facilitating strategies for each phase emerged. The aim of the present study was to evaluate inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool. Methods: The first author (LN) selected 24 video-sequences within the video data collected in the project. Each of the eight phases in the identified process were represented by three video-clips. The video-clips ranged in length between two to five minutes. LN's ratings served as criterion rating against which three independent raters' judgements were compared. The three raters were all occupational therapists, and two were experienced with the Driving to Learn™ method, powered wheelchair provision and the target population; and one was inexperienced. Results: When comparing the three raters' assessments with that of LN (N = 72), the calculation gave a weighted kappa value of 0.85. All raters judged the tool as having a high degree of usability for assessing phases of joystick-use. Minimal differences were found between the experienced and inexperienced raters. Conclusion and significance of the study: The inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool was very good. The findings indicate that the tool is reliable and has clinical usability in occupational therapy practice.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Lisbeth and Eklund, Mona and Nyberg, Per},
  issn         = {1440-1630},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {447--454},
  publisher    = {Australian Association of occupational therapists},
  series       = {Australian Occupational Therapy Journal},
  title        = {Driving to Learn in a powered wheelchair: Inter-rater reliability of a tool for assessment of joystick-use.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1630.2011.00983.x},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2011},
}