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Socioeconomic Position, Comorbidity, and Mortality in Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

Ohrlander, Tomas; Merlo, Juan LU ; Ohlsson, Henrik LU ; Sonesson, Björn LU and Acosta, Stefan LU (2012) In Annals of Vascular Surgery 26. p.312-321
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To evaluate factors associated with incidence and 3-year all-cause mortality in patients with aortic aneurysm (AA). The design is sex and age-stratified (60-79 and 80-90 years) prospective cohort. By using the population register, we constituted a cohort of all men and women born between 1900 and 1930 and living in Scania by 1991, and followed them for 13 years. Identification of AA was based on hospital discharge diagnosis obtained from the Swedish Patient Register or from the information on death certificates from the Cause of Death Register. METHODS: We applied stepwise Cox regression and investigated both AA incidence (1991-2003) as well as 3-year survival after the first hospitalization for AA. RESULTS: We found an inverse... (More)
BACKGROUND: To evaluate factors associated with incidence and 3-year all-cause mortality in patients with aortic aneurysm (AA). The design is sex and age-stratified (60-79 and 80-90 years) prospective cohort. By using the population register, we constituted a cohort of all men and women born between 1900 and 1930 and living in Scania by 1991, and followed them for 13 years. Identification of AA was based on hospital discharge diagnosis obtained from the Swedish Patient Register or from the information on death certificates from the Cause of Death Register. METHODS: We applied stepwise Cox regression and investigated both AA incidence (1991-2003) as well as 3-year survival after the first hospitalization for AA. RESULTS: We found an inverse relation between AA incidence and previous hospitalization by diabetes mellitus in women (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-0.88) and in men (HR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.24-0.61) aged 60-79 years. Three-year all-cause mortality after diagnosis of AA was 58.6% in women, 50.2% in men, 72.9% in octogenarians, and 43.7% for nonoctogenarians. Low income, chronic respiratory diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, dementia, systemic connective tissue disorders, renal failure, and malignant neoplasms were independent factors for mortality in 60-79-year-old men with AA. CONCLUSIONS: Inferior socioeconomic position is associated with increased 3-year all-cause mortality in 60-79-year-old men with AA. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Vascular Surgery
volume
26
pages
312 - 321
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000301847700003
  • pmid:22079461
  • scopus:84858442219
ISSN
1615-5947
DOI
10.1016/j.avsg.2011.08.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4632927-46c4-4616-a5dc-6d955133fcaf (old id 2220815)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22079461?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-12-02 21:21:59
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:53:54
@article{b4632927-46c4-4616-a5dc-6d955133fcaf,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: To evaluate factors associated with incidence and 3-year all-cause mortality in patients with aortic aneurysm (AA). The design is sex and age-stratified (60-79 and 80-90 years) prospective cohort. By using the population register, we constituted a cohort of all men and women born between 1900 and 1930 and living in Scania by 1991, and followed them for 13 years. Identification of AA was based on hospital discharge diagnosis obtained from the Swedish Patient Register or from the information on death certificates from the Cause of Death Register. METHODS: We applied stepwise Cox regression and investigated both AA incidence (1991-2003) as well as 3-year survival after the first hospitalization for AA. RESULTS: We found an inverse relation between AA incidence and previous hospitalization by diabetes mellitus in women (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-0.88) and in men (HR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.24-0.61) aged 60-79 years. Three-year all-cause mortality after diagnosis of AA was 58.6% in women, 50.2% in men, 72.9% in octogenarians, and 43.7% for nonoctogenarians. Low income, chronic respiratory diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, dementia, systemic connective tissue disorders, renal failure, and malignant neoplasms were independent factors for mortality in 60-79-year-old men with AA. CONCLUSIONS: Inferior socioeconomic position is associated with increased 3-year all-cause mortality in 60-79-year-old men with AA.},
  author       = {Ohrlander, Tomas and Merlo, Juan and Ohlsson, Henrik and Sonesson, Björn and Acosta, Stefan},
  issn         = {1615-5947},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {312--321},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Annals of Vascular Surgery},
  title        = {Socioeconomic Position, Comorbidity, and Mortality in Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Prospective Cohort Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2011.08.003},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2012},
}