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Hearing Christ Proclaimed: Mapping the Aural Features of John 1:19–51

Nässelqvist, Dan LU (2011) Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting 2011
Abstract
In the ancient world, writings were routinely delivered orally by trained lectors. An important task for the lector was to give voice to the silent, close-knit lines of scriptio continua manuscripts. This was made possible by the fact that the oral structure and aural character were encoded into the text.



This paper analyzes the sound structure of John 1:19–51 and identifies what aural features would have been prominent when it was read aloud. By applying the emerging methodology of sound mapping (introduced by Margaret Ellen Lee and Bernard Brandon Scott) to the first chapter of the Gospel of John, it intends to demonstrate how the sounded text varies and makes some passages stand out aurally at the expense of others.... (More)
In the ancient world, writings were routinely delivered orally by trained lectors. An important task for the lector was to give voice to the silent, close-knit lines of scriptio continua manuscripts. This was made possible by the fact that the oral structure and aural character were encoded into the text.



This paper analyzes the sound structure of John 1:19–51 and identifies what aural features would have been prominent when it was read aloud. By applying the emerging methodology of sound mapping (introduced by Margaret Ellen Lee and Bernard Brandon Scott) to the first chapter of the Gospel of John, it intends to demonstrate how the sounded text varies and makes some passages stand out aurally at the expense of others. Analyzing the aural features encoded in the text, e.g. variations in tempo, smoothness, and rhythm, it will also point out that some of the Christological phrases are highlighted in a very conspicuous way and consider what this entails for the whole pericope. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keywords
New Testament, Gospel of John, Rhetoric, Performance, Orality, Sound Analysis
conference name
Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting 2011
conference dates
2011-11-19 - 2011-11-22
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: New Testament Studies (015017052)
id
d859ae37-55d5-4a4c-95cf-b6d5797b9df0 (old id 2223641)
date added to LUP
2016-04-04 13:30:02
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:14:23
@misc{d859ae37-55d5-4a4c-95cf-b6d5797b9df0,
  abstract     = {In the ancient world, writings were routinely delivered orally by trained lectors. An important task for the lector was to give voice to the silent, close-knit lines of scriptio continua manuscripts. This was made possible by the fact that the oral structure and aural character were encoded into the text.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This paper analyzes the sound structure of John 1:19–51 and identifies what aural features would have been prominent when it was read aloud. By applying the emerging methodology of sound mapping (introduced by Margaret Ellen Lee and Bernard Brandon Scott) to the first chapter of the Gospel of John, it intends to demonstrate how the sounded text varies and makes some passages stand out aurally at the expense of others. Analyzing the aural features encoded in the text, e.g. variations in tempo, smoothness, and rhythm, it will also point out that some of the Christological phrases are highlighted in a very conspicuous way and consider what this entails for the whole pericope.},
  author       = {Nässelqvist, Dan},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Hearing Christ Proclaimed: Mapping the Aural Features of John 1:19–51},
  year         = {2011},
}