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Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries : Experimental Models for Repair and Reconstruction

Dahlin, Lars B. LU ; Stenberg, Lena LU ; Englund Johansson, Ulrica LU and Johansson, Fredrik LU (2019) In Neuromethods 149. p.169-186
Abstract

Peripheral nerve injuries are difficult to treat, and the clinical outcome after surgical repair and reconstruction is still insufficient, particularly concerning recovery of sensory function. To improve the clinical treatment strategies, experimental models are used to systematically examine the mechanisms behind nerve regeneration and assess the improvement of nerve regeneration by introduction of new surgical nerve repair and reconstruction methods (e.g., novel devices made by bioartificial materials). Rat models, where the sciatic nerve has essentially a similar size as a human digital nerve, are widely used to evaluate nerve regeneration with the inherent advantages and disadvantages of the experimental models. Estimations... (More)

Peripheral nerve injuries are difficult to treat, and the clinical outcome after surgical repair and reconstruction is still insufficient, particularly concerning recovery of sensory function. To improve the clinical treatment strategies, experimental models are used to systematically examine the mechanisms behind nerve regeneration and assess the improvement of nerve regeneration by introduction of new surgical nerve repair and reconstruction methods (e.g., novel devices made by bioartificial materials). Rat models, where the sciatic nerve has essentially a similar size as a human digital nerve, are widely used to evaluate nerve regeneration with the inherent advantages and disadvantages of the experimental models. Estimations revealing that a large number of diabetic patients will eventually suffer from peripheral nerve injury have motivated development of suitable experimental diabetes models for studying the nerve regeneration process and novel treatment approaches. We have successfully used the Goto-Kakizaki rat model, which shows moderately increased blood sugar closely resembling type 2 diabetes, for assessing the surgical peripheral nerve regeneration potential with and without artificial scaffolds. In order to improve outcome after repair and reconstruction of nerve injuries, one has to have a clear concept concerning how to evaluate novel repair and reconstruction techniques in experimental models before clinical studies can be initiated in an accurate way.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Diabetes, Electrospun fibers, Nanomaterials, Nanotechniques, Nerve conduits, Nerve reconstruction, Nerve regeneration, Nerve repair
host publication
Animal Models of Neurotrauma
series title
Neuromethods
editor
Risling, Mårten; Davidsson, Johan; and
volume
149
pages
18 pages
publisher
Humana Press
ISSN
0893-2336
1940-6045
ISBN
978-1-4939-9711-4
978-1-4939-9709-1
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4939-9711-4_9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
222d28ea-02e9-4c6f-a7e6-9d8071d93bbc
date added to LUP
2019-08-22 11:37:02
date last changed
2019-08-29 01:54:44
@inbook{222d28ea-02e9-4c6f-a7e6-9d8071d93bbc,
  abstract     = {<p>Peripheral nerve injuries are difficult to treat, and the clinical outcome after surgical repair and reconstruction is still insufficient, particularly concerning recovery of sensory function. To improve the clinical treatment strategies, experimental models are used to systematically examine the mechanisms behind nerve regeneration and assess the improvement of nerve regeneration by introduction of new surgical nerve repair and reconstruction methods (e.g., novel devices made by bioartificial materials). Rat models, where the sciatic nerve has essentially a similar size as a human digital nerve, are widely used to evaluate nerve regeneration with the inherent advantages and disadvantages of the experimental models. Estimations revealing that a large number of diabetic patients will eventually suffer from peripheral nerve injury have motivated development of suitable experimental diabetes models for studying the nerve regeneration process and novel treatment approaches. We have successfully used the Goto-Kakizaki rat model, which shows moderately increased blood sugar closely resembling type 2 diabetes, for assessing the surgical peripheral nerve regeneration potential with and without artificial scaffolds. In order to improve outcome after repair and reconstruction of nerve injuries, one has to have a clear concept concerning how to evaluate novel repair and reconstruction techniques in experimental models before clinical studies can be initiated in an accurate way.</p>},
  author       = {Dahlin, Lars B. and Stenberg, Lena and Englund Johansson, Ulrica and Johansson, Fredrik},
  editor       = {Risling, Mårten and Davidsson, Johan},
  isbn         = {978-1-4939-9711-4},
  issn         = {0893-2336},
  keyword      = {Diabetes,Electrospun fibers,Nanomaterials,Nanotechniques,Nerve conduits,Nerve reconstruction,Nerve regeneration,Nerve repair},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  pages        = {169--186},
  publisher    = {Humana Press},
  series       = {Neuromethods},
  title        = {Traumatic Peripheral Nerve Injuries : Experimental Models for Repair and Reconstruction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9711-4_9},
  volume       = {149},
  year         = {2019},
}