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The Relationship Between Personality and Subjective Well-Being: Different Association Patterns When Measuring the Affective Component in Frequency and Intensity

Garcia, Danilo and Erlandsson, Arvid LU (2011) In Journal of Happiness Studies 12(6). p.1023-1034
Abstract
The aim was to determine whether the relationship between personality traits and Subjective Well-Being (SWB) differs when the affective component of SWB is measured in terms of frequency or intensity. Extraversion and Neuroticism were expected to show significant but different associations to SWB depending on the dimension of the affective component. Swedish undergraduate students (N = 153) self-reported personality, life satisfaction (LS), and affect measured in both frequency (i.e., how often they feel certain affects) and intensity (i.e., how strongly they feel certain affects). Two types of SWB-scores were constructed by merging LS with affect measured in either frequency or intensity. While Extraversion had a similar effect on both... (More)
The aim was to determine whether the relationship between personality traits and Subjective Well-Being (SWB) differs when the affective component of SWB is measured in terms of frequency or intensity. Extraversion and Neuroticism were expected to show significant but different associations to SWB depending on the dimension of the affective component. Swedish undergraduate students (N = 153) self-reported personality, life satisfaction (LS), and affect measured in both frequency (i.e., how often they feel certain affects) and intensity (i.e., how strongly they feel certain affects). Two types of SWB-scores were constructed by merging LS with affect measured in either frequency or intensity. While Extraversion had a similar effect on both types of SWB, Neuroticism had a significantly stronger effect on SWB when the affective component was measured in frequency. More importantly, the effect of Neuroticism, compared to Extraversion, was stronger on SWB regardless of the dimension of the affective component. These findings suggest that future research should clearly distinguish between intensity and frequency when measuring the affective component of SWB. The distinction is important, not only due to the distinctiveness of the affective dimensions per se, but also due to different association patterns between personality traits and both dimensions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Affect balance, Affect frequency and intensity, Extraversion, Negative, affect, Neuroticism, Personality, Positive affect, Subjective well-being
in
Journal of Happiness Studies
volume
12
issue
6
pages
1023 - 1034
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000296301200007
  • scopus:80255135500
ISSN
1389-4978
DOI
10.1007/s10902-010-9242-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
362ac8a5-0be3-4c48-acc9-538e929a5139 (old id 2254444)
date added to LUP
2011-12-20 09:37:22
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:08:51
@article{362ac8a5-0be3-4c48-acc9-538e929a5139,
  abstract     = {The aim was to determine whether the relationship between personality traits and Subjective Well-Being (SWB) differs when the affective component of SWB is measured in terms of frequency or intensity. Extraversion and Neuroticism were expected to show significant but different associations to SWB depending on the dimension of the affective component. Swedish undergraduate students (N = 153) self-reported personality, life satisfaction (LS), and affect measured in both frequency (i.e., how often they feel certain affects) and intensity (i.e., how strongly they feel certain affects). Two types of SWB-scores were constructed by merging LS with affect measured in either frequency or intensity. While Extraversion had a similar effect on both types of SWB, Neuroticism had a significantly stronger effect on SWB when the affective component was measured in frequency. More importantly, the effect of Neuroticism, compared to Extraversion, was stronger on SWB regardless of the dimension of the affective component. These findings suggest that future research should clearly distinguish between intensity and frequency when measuring the affective component of SWB. The distinction is important, not only due to the distinctiveness of the affective dimensions per se, but also due to different association patterns between personality traits and both dimensions.},
  author       = {Garcia, Danilo and Erlandsson, Arvid},
  issn         = {1389-4978},
  keyword      = {Affect balance,Affect frequency and intensity,Extraversion,Negative,affect,Neuroticism,Personality,Positive affect,Subjective well-being},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1023--1034},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Happiness Studies},
  title        = {The Relationship Between Personality and Subjective Well-Being: Different Association Patterns When Measuring the Affective Component in Frequency and Intensity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10902-010-9242-6},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2011},
}