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Tissue temperature control using a water-cooled applicator: Implications for transurethral laser-induced thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia

Sturesson, C and Andersson-Engels, Stefan LU (1997) In Medical Physics 24(3). p.461-470
Abstract
A prototype to a water-cooled applicator to be used in transurethral laser-induced thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia was developed. The flexible applicator was made of Teflon(TM) tubes except for the distal outer part which was made of glass, providing a transparent medium for laser radiation and enabling efficient cooling of the surrounding tissue. For heating, laser light from a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm, which was coupled into an optical fiber with an institutionally made diffusing tip, was used. Cooling was performed by flushing water through the applicator. By using a mathematical model it was possible to connect the temperature rise of the water in the applicator to the maximum tissue temperature. Tissue light... (More)
A prototype to a water-cooled applicator to be used in transurethral laser-induced thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia was developed. The flexible applicator was made of Teflon(TM) tubes except for the distal outer part which was made of glass, providing a transparent medium for laser radiation and enabling efficient cooling of the surrounding tissue. For heating, laser light from a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm, which was coupled into an optical fiber with an institutionally made diffusing tip, was used. Cooling was performed by flushing water through the applicator. By using a mathematical model it was possible to connect the temperature rise of the water in the applicator to the maximum tissue temperature. Tissue light absorption was calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and the heat conduction equation was solved numerically using a finite-difference technique. Experiments on porcine liver in vitro showed that the maximum tissue temperature could be estimated with an average accuracy of 0.4 degrees C by measuring the difference in outlet and inlet applicator water temperature and using the thermal model. The results presented suggest that the described method for temperature control can be used during laser prostatectomy to maximize the lesion size while preventing carbonization. (C) 1997 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Physics
volume
24
issue
3
pages
461 - 470
publisher
American Association of Physicists in Medicine
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0030999910
ISSN
0094-2405
DOI
10.1118/1.597912
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b17ecd21-e062-4a59-b2b7-bc914b26382a (old id 2259429)
date added to LUP
2012-02-09 21:02:16
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:47:34
@article{b17ecd21-e062-4a59-b2b7-bc914b26382a,
  abstract     = {A prototype to a water-cooled applicator to be used in transurethral laser-induced thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia was developed. The flexible applicator was made of Teflon(TM) tubes except for the distal outer part which was made of glass, providing a transparent medium for laser radiation and enabling efficient cooling of the surrounding tissue. For heating, laser light from a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm, which was coupled into an optical fiber with an institutionally made diffusing tip, was used. Cooling was performed by flushing water through the applicator. By using a mathematical model it was possible to connect the temperature rise of the water in the applicator to the maximum tissue temperature. Tissue light absorption was calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and the heat conduction equation was solved numerically using a finite-difference technique. Experiments on porcine liver in vitro showed that the maximum tissue temperature could be estimated with an average accuracy of 0.4 degrees C by measuring the difference in outlet and inlet applicator water temperature and using the thermal model. The results presented suggest that the described method for temperature control can be used during laser prostatectomy to maximize the lesion size while preventing carbonization. (C) 1997 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.},
  author       = {Sturesson, C and Andersson-Engels, Stefan},
  issn         = {0094-2405},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {461--470},
  publisher    = {American Association of Physicists in Medicine},
  series       = {Medical Physics},
  title        = {Tissue temperature control using a water-cooled applicator: Implications for transurethral laser-induced thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.597912},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {1997},
}