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Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)

Weibring, Petter LU ; Edner, Hans LU ; Svanberg, Sune LU ; Cecchi, G; Pantani, L; Ferrara, R and Caltabiano, T (1998) In Applied Physics B 67(4). p.419-426
Abstract
The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in... (More)
The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Applied Physics B
volume
67
issue
4
pages
419 - 426
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032180949
ISSN
0946-2171
DOI
10.1007/s003400050525
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5fc04a11-2abb-4bf3-bc43-b3706944593a (old id 2259702)
alternative location
http://lup.lub.lu.se/record/2259702/file/2297690.pdf
date added to LUP
2012-02-07 00:19:27
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:08:44
@article{5fc04a11-2abb-4bf3-bc43-b3706944593a,
  abstract     = {The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively.},
  author       = {Weibring, Petter and Edner, Hans and Svanberg, Sune and Cecchi, G and Pantani, L and Ferrara, R and Caltabiano, T},
  issn         = {0946-2171},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {419--426},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Applied Physics B},
  title        = {Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s003400050525},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {1998},
}