Advanced

Switching From High-Fat to Low-Fat Diet Normalizes Glucose Metabolism and Improves Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity But Not Body Weight in C57BL/6J Mice.

Agardh, Carl-David LU and Ahrén, Bo LU (2012) In Pancreas 41(2). p.253-257
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Environmental factors such as a high-fat diet contribute to type 2 diabetes and obesity. This study examined glycemia, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function after switching from a high-fat diet to a low-fat diet in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet or low-fat diet for 18 months, after which mice on the high-fat diet either maintained this diet or switched to a low-fat diet for 4 weeks. Body weight and glucose and insulin responses to intraperitoneal glucose were determined. Insulin secretion (insulinogenic index: the 10-minute insulin response divided by the 10-minute glucose level) and insulin sensitivity (1 divided by basal insulin) were determined. RESULTS: After 18 months on a high-fat diet, mice had... (More)
OBJECTIVES: Environmental factors such as a high-fat diet contribute to type 2 diabetes and obesity. This study examined glycemia, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function after switching from a high-fat diet to a low-fat diet in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet or low-fat diet for 18 months, after which mice on the high-fat diet either maintained this diet or switched to a low-fat diet for 4 weeks. Body weight and glucose and insulin responses to intraperitoneal glucose were determined. Insulin secretion (insulinogenic index: the 10-minute insulin response divided by the 10-minute glucose level) and insulin sensitivity (1 divided by basal insulin) were determined. RESULTS: After 18 months on a high-fat diet, mice had glucose intolerance, marked hyperinsulinemia, and increased body weight compared to mice on a low-fat diet (P < 0.001). Switching from a high-fat diet to low-fat diet normalized glucose tolerance, reduced but not normalized body weight (P < 0.001), increased insulin secretion (248 ± 39 vs 141 ± 46 pmol/mmol; P = 0.028) and improved but not normalized insulin sensitivity (3.2 ± 0.1 vs 1.0 ± 0.1 [pmol/L]; P = 0.012). CONCLUSION: Switching from a high-fat diet to low-fat diet normalizes glucose tolerance and improves but not normalizes insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. These effects are more pronounced than the reduced body weight. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pancreas
volume
41
issue
2
pages
253 - 257
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000300641500013
  • pmid:22158067
  • scopus:84857921433
ISSN
0885-3177
DOI
10.1097/MPA.0b013e3182243107
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
08a5683a-b970-41b4-9a83-f75912cd13de (old id 2274150)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158067?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-01-03 18:51:48
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:18:12
@article{08a5683a-b970-41b4-9a83-f75912cd13de,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES: Environmental factors such as a high-fat diet contribute to type 2 diabetes and obesity. This study examined glycemia, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function after switching from a high-fat diet to a low-fat diet in mice. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet or low-fat diet for 18 months, after which mice on the high-fat diet either maintained this diet or switched to a low-fat diet for 4 weeks. Body weight and glucose and insulin responses to intraperitoneal glucose were determined. Insulin secretion (insulinogenic index: the 10-minute insulin response divided by the 10-minute glucose level) and insulin sensitivity (1 divided by basal insulin) were determined. RESULTS: After 18 months on a high-fat diet, mice had glucose intolerance, marked hyperinsulinemia, and increased body weight compared to mice on a low-fat diet (P &lt; 0.001). Switching from a high-fat diet to low-fat diet normalized glucose tolerance, reduced but not normalized body weight (P &lt; 0.001), increased insulin secretion (248 ± 39 vs 141 ± 46 pmol/mmol; P = 0.028) and improved but not normalized insulin sensitivity (3.2 ± 0.1 vs 1.0 ± 0.1 [pmol/L]; P = 0.012). CONCLUSION: Switching from a high-fat diet to low-fat diet normalizes glucose tolerance and improves but not normalizes insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. These effects are more pronounced than the reduced body weight.},
  author       = {Agardh, Carl-David and Ahrén, Bo},
  issn         = {0885-3177},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {253--257},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Pancreas},
  title        = {Switching From High-Fat to Low-Fat Diet Normalizes Glucose Metabolism and Improves Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity But Not Body Weight in C57BL/6J Mice.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPA.0b013e3182243107},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2012},
}