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Former Male Elite Athletes Have a Higher Prevalence of Osteoarthritis and Arthroplasty in the Hip and Knee Than Expected.

Tveit, Magnus LU ; Rosengren, Björn LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2012) In American Journal of Sports Medicine 40(3). p.527-533
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Intense exercise has been reported as one risk factor for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate (1) whether this is true for both former impact and nonimpact athletes, (2) if the risk of a hip or knee arthroplasty due to OA is higher than expected, and (3) if joint deterioration is associated with knee injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: The prevalence of OA and arthroplasty in the hip and knee were registered in 709 former male elite athletes with a median age of 70 years (range, 50-93 years), retired from sports for a median 35 years (range, 1-63 years), and compared with 1368 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as means with 95% confidence... (More)
BACKGROUND: Intense exercise has been reported as one risk factor for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate (1) whether this is true for both former impact and nonimpact athletes, (2) if the risk of a hip or knee arthroplasty due to OA is higher than expected, and (3) if joint deterioration is associated with knee injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: The prevalence of OA and arthroplasty in the hip and knee were registered in 709 former male elite athletes with a median age of 70 years (range, 50-93 years), retired from sports for a median 35 years (range, 1-63 years), and compared with 1368 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). RESULTS: The risk of hip or knee OA was higher in former athletes (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.3), as was arthroplasty based on OA in either of these joints (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-3.1). The risk of hip OA was doubled (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.5-2.8) and hip arthroplasty was 2.5 times higher (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.7) in former athletes than in controls, predominantly driven by a higher risk in former impact athletes. Also, the risk of knee OA was higher (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.1), as was knee arthroplasty (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.7), driven by a higher risk in both former impact and nonimpact athletes. Knee OA in impact athletes was associated with knee injury. CONCLUSION: Hip and knee OA and hip and knee arthroplasty are more commonly found in former male elite athletes than expected. A previous knee injury is associated with knee OA in former impact athletes but not in nonimpact athletes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Sports Medicine
volume
40
issue
3
pages
527 - 533
publisher
American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
external identifiers
  • wos:000301065100004
  • pmid:22130474
  • scopus:84857940180
ISSN
1552-3365
DOI
10.1177/0363546511429278
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b8004021-9647-4467-8ada-147036b6f657 (old id 2274734)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22130474?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-01-02 12:33:48
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:28:07
@article{b8004021-9647-4467-8ada-147036b6f657,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Intense exercise has been reported as one risk factor for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate (1) whether this is true for both former impact and nonimpact athletes, (2) if the risk of a hip or knee arthroplasty due to OA is higher than expected, and (3) if joint deterioration is associated with knee injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: The prevalence of OA and arthroplasty in the hip and knee were registered in 709 former male elite athletes with a median age of 70 years (range, 50-93 years), retired from sports for a median 35 years (range, 1-63 years), and compared with 1368 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as means with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). RESULTS: The risk of hip or knee OA was higher in former athletes (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.3), as was arthroplasty based on OA in either of these joints (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.6-3.1). The risk of hip OA was doubled (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.5-2.8) and hip arthroplasty was 2.5 times higher (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.7) in former athletes than in controls, predominantly driven by a higher risk in former impact athletes. Also, the risk of knee OA was higher (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.1), as was knee arthroplasty (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.7), driven by a higher risk in both former impact and nonimpact athletes. Knee OA in impact athletes was associated with knee injury. CONCLUSION: Hip and knee OA and hip and knee arthroplasty are more commonly found in former male elite athletes than expected. A previous knee injury is associated with knee OA in former impact athletes but not in nonimpact athletes.},
  author       = {Tveit, Magnus and Rosengren, Björn and Nilsson, Jan-Åke and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1552-3365},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {527--533},
  publisher    = {American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine},
  series       = {American Journal of Sports Medicine},
  title        = {Former Male Elite Athletes Have a Higher Prevalence of Osteoarthritis and Arthroplasty in the Hip and Knee Than Expected.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546511429278},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2012},
}