Advanced

The quantitative proteome of a human cell line

Beck, Martin; Schmidt, Alexander; Malmström, Johan LU ; Claassen, Manfred; Ori, Alessandro; Szymborska, Anna; Herzog, Franz; Rinner, Oliver; Ellenberg, Jan and Aebersold, Ruedi (2011) In Molecular Systems Biology 7.
Abstract
The generation of mathematical models of biological processes, the simulation of these processes under different conditions, and the comparison and integration of multiple data sets are explicit goals of systems biology that require the knowledge of the absolute quantity of the system's components. To date, systematic estimates of cellular protein concentrations have been exceptionally scarce. Here, we provide a quantitative description of the proteome of a commonly used human cell line in two functional states, interphase and mitosis. We show that these human cultured cells express at least similar to 10 000 proteins and that the quantified proteins span a concentration range of seven orders of magnitude up to 20 000 000 copies per cell.... (More)
The generation of mathematical models of biological processes, the simulation of these processes under different conditions, and the comparison and integration of multiple data sets are explicit goals of systems biology that require the knowledge of the absolute quantity of the system's components. To date, systematic estimates of cellular protein concentrations have been exceptionally scarce. Here, we provide a quantitative description of the proteome of a commonly used human cell line in two functional states, interphase and mitosis. We show that these human cultured cells express at least similar to 10 000 proteins and that the quantified proteins span a concentration range of seven orders of magnitude up to 20 000 000 copies per cell. We discuss how protein abundance is linked to function and evolution. Molecular Systems Biology 7: 549; published online 8 November 2011; doi:10.1038/msb.2011.82 (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
mass spectrometry, protein abundance, proteomics
in
Molecular Systems Biology
volume
7
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000297685900006
  • scopus:80855128111
ISSN
1744-4292
DOI
10.1038/msb.2011.82
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c322fd3-ebd7-40df-a082-8f7cd88031f7 (old id 2291698)
date added to LUP
2012-01-11 13:12:29
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:02:10
@article{6c322fd3-ebd7-40df-a082-8f7cd88031f7,
  abstract     = {The generation of mathematical models of biological processes, the simulation of these processes under different conditions, and the comparison and integration of multiple data sets are explicit goals of systems biology that require the knowledge of the absolute quantity of the system's components. To date, systematic estimates of cellular protein concentrations have been exceptionally scarce. Here, we provide a quantitative description of the proteome of a commonly used human cell line in two functional states, interphase and mitosis. We show that these human cultured cells express at least similar to 10 000 proteins and that the quantified proteins span a concentration range of seven orders of magnitude up to 20 000 000 copies per cell. We discuss how protein abundance is linked to function and evolution. Molecular Systems Biology 7: 549; published online 8 November 2011; doi:10.1038/msb.2011.82},
  author       = {Beck, Martin and Schmidt, Alexander and Malmström, Johan and Claassen, Manfred and Ori, Alessandro and Szymborska, Anna and Herzog, Franz and Rinner, Oliver and Ellenberg, Jan and Aebersold, Ruedi},
  issn         = {1744-4292},
  keyword      = {mass spectrometry,protein abundance,proteomics},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Molecular Systems Biology},
  title        = {The quantitative proteome of a human cell line},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/msb.2011.82},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2011},
}