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Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: A randomised, controlled and blinded study

Tibaek, S; Gard, Gunvor LU and Jensen, R (2005) In Neurourology and Urodynamics 24(4). p.348-357
Abstract
Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence (UI) after ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised to a Treatment Group (14 subjects) or a Control Group (12 subjects) in a single blinded, randomised study. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised PFMT. The outcome measures were: (1) diary recording the frequency of voiding, the number of incontinence episodes and used pads; (2) 24-hr home pad test; and (3) vaginal palpation of pelvic floor muscle evaluating function, strength, static and dynamic endurance. Results: Twenty-four subjects... (More)
Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence (UI) after ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised to a Treatment Group (14 subjects) or a Control Group (12 subjects) in a single blinded, randomised study. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised PFMT. The outcome measures were: (1) diary recording the frequency of voiding, the number of incontinence episodes and used pads; (2) 24-hr home pad test; and (3) vaginal palpation of pelvic floor muscle evaluating function, strength, static and dynamic endurance. Results: Twenty-four subjects with urge, stress and mixed stress/urge incontinence, completed the study, 12 in each group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (Treatment Group/Control Group: 7/8 at pre-test, 6/9 at post-test (median values), P = 0.018), 24-hr pad test (Treatment Group/Control Group: 8/12 to 2/8 g P = 0.013) and dynamic endurance of pelvic floor muscle (Treatment Group/Control Group: 11120 to 20/8 contractions of Pelvic Floor Muscle, P = 0.028) was demonstrated in the Treatment Group compared to the Control Group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (decreased from seven to six, P = 0.036), pelvic floor muscle function (P = 0.034), strength (P = 0.046), static endurance increased from 9 to 30 see (P = 0.028) and dynamic endurance increased from 11 to 20 contractions (P = 0.020) was also demonstrated within the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group. Conclusion: PFMT had a significant effect in women with UI after stroke measured by diaries, pad tests and vaginal palpation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
physical therapy, pelvic floor muscle training, women, stroke, urinary, incontinence
in
Neurourology and Urodynamics
volume
24
issue
4
pages
348 - 357
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000230289000010
  • pmid:15791633
  • scopus:21744446092
ISSN
0733-2467
DOI
10.1002/nau.20134
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
36f1b03f-655f-4cfb-81b0-13059891a988 (old id 233378)
date added to LUP
2007-08-22 16:54:33
date last changed
2017-08-27 04:24:17
@article{36f1b03f-655f-4cfb-81b0-13059891a988,
  abstract     = {Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence (UI) after ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised to a Treatment Group (14 subjects) or a Control Group (12 subjects) in a single blinded, randomised study. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised PFMT. The outcome measures were: (1) diary recording the frequency of voiding, the number of incontinence episodes and used pads; (2) 24-hr home pad test; and (3) vaginal palpation of pelvic floor muscle evaluating function, strength, static and dynamic endurance. Results: Twenty-four subjects with urge, stress and mixed stress/urge incontinence, completed the study, 12 in each group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (Treatment Group/Control Group: 7/8 at pre-test, 6/9 at post-test (median values), P = 0.018), 24-hr pad test (Treatment Group/Control Group: 8/12 to 2/8 g P = 0.013) and dynamic endurance of pelvic floor muscle (Treatment Group/Control Group: 11120 to 20/8 contractions of Pelvic Floor Muscle, P = 0.028) was demonstrated in the Treatment Group compared to the Control Group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (decreased from seven to six, P = 0.036), pelvic floor muscle function (P = 0.034), strength (P = 0.046), static endurance increased from 9 to 30 see (P = 0.028) and dynamic endurance increased from 11 to 20 contractions (P = 0.020) was also demonstrated within the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group. Conclusion: PFMT had a significant effect in women with UI after stroke measured by diaries, pad tests and vaginal palpation.},
  author       = {Tibaek, S and Gard, Gunvor and Jensen, R},
  issn         = {0733-2467},
  keyword      = {physical therapy,pelvic floor muscle training,women,stroke,urinary,incontinence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {348--357},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Neurourology and Urodynamics},
  title        = {Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: A randomised, controlled and blinded study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.20134},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2005},
}