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Oral and faecal lactobacilli and their expression of mannose-specific adhesins in individuals with and without IgA deficiency

Lonnermark, Elisabet; Nowrouzinan, Forough; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Ahrné, Siv LU ; Wold, Agnes and Friman, Vanda (2012) In International Journal of Medical Microbiology 302(1). p.53-60
Abstract
Lactobacilli are present in the intestine and oral cavity of most adults. Secretory IgA in mucosal secretions may provide carbohydrate receptors for bacterial adhesins. Here, oral and faecal samples from 33 IgA-deficient individuals and 34 controls were cultured for lactobacilli, which were identified using species-specific PCR or partial 165 rDNA sequencing and tested for expression of mannose-specific adhesins. Lactobacilli were found in the oral cavity of 76% of IgA-deficient and 85% of control individuals. Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus gasseri dominated in both groups. Lactobacillus fermentum was less common in IgA-deficient individuals than in controls (p = 0.0055) and Lactobacillus salivarius was less common in... (More)
Lactobacilli are present in the intestine and oral cavity of most adults. Secretory IgA in mucosal secretions may provide carbohydrate receptors for bacterial adhesins. Here, oral and faecal samples from 33 IgA-deficient individuals and 34 controls were cultured for lactobacilli, which were identified using species-specific PCR or partial 165 rDNA sequencing and tested for expression of mannose-specific adhesins. Lactobacilli were found in the oral cavity of 76% of IgA-deficient and 85% of control individuals. Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus gasseri dominated in both groups. Lactobacillus fermentum was less common in IgA-deficient individuals than in controls (p = 0.0055) and Lactobacillus salivarius was less common in symptomatic than in healthy IgA-deficient individuals (p = 0.0051). Faecal samples yielded lactobacilli in most individuals. L. paracasei was most frequent, followed by L. gasseri and Lactobacillus plantarum. Mannose-specific adhesins were expressed more frequently by oral than by faecal isolates (p = 0.032) and oral isolates adhered in higher numbers than faecal isolates (46 vs. 14 bacteria/cell, p = 0.0038). Faecal isolates from IgA-deficient individuals more frequently expressed mannose-specific adhesins than faecal isolates from controls (p = 0.039). Mannose-specific adhesins may be a colonisation factor in the oral cavity, and the presence of secretory IgA may modify adhesin expression. However, secretory IgA seems to have little influence on Lactobacillus species distribution. (C) 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lactobacillus, IgA deficiency, Gut, Oral, Microbiota, Adhesion
in
International Journal of Medical Microbiology
volume
302
issue
1
pages
53 - 60
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000298525500007
  • scopus:81255157867
ISSN
1618-0607
DOI
10.1016/j.ijmm.2011.08.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
162b01a9-f4ea-4613-ae94-815400f4c526 (old id 2333899)
date added to LUP
2012-01-30 14:54:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:10:25
@article{162b01a9-f4ea-4613-ae94-815400f4c526,
  abstract     = {Lactobacilli are present in the intestine and oral cavity of most adults. Secretory IgA in mucosal secretions may provide carbohydrate receptors for bacterial adhesins. Here, oral and faecal samples from 33 IgA-deficient individuals and 34 controls were cultured for lactobacilli, which were identified using species-specific PCR or partial 165 rDNA sequencing and tested for expression of mannose-specific adhesins. Lactobacilli were found in the oral cavity of 76% of IgA-deficient and 85% of control individuals. Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus gasseri dominated in both groups. Lactobacillus fermentum was less common in IgA-deficient individuals than in controls (p = 0.0055) and Lactobacillus salivarius was less common in symptomatic than in healthy IgA-deficient individuals (p = 0.0051). Faecal samples yielded lactobacilli in most individuals. L. paracasei was most frequent, followed by L. gasseri and Lactobacillus plantarum. Mannose-specific adhesins were expressed more frequently by oral than by faecal isolates (p = 0.032) and oral isolates adhered in higher numbers than faecal isolates (46 vs. 14 bacteria/cell, p = 0.0038). Faecal isolates from IgA-deficient individuals more frequently expressed mannose-specific adhesins than faecal isolates from controls (p = 0.039). Mannose-specific adhesins may be a colonisation factor in the oral cavity, and the presence of secretory IgA may modify adhesin expression. However, secretory IgA seems to have little influence on Lactobacillus species distribution. (C) 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Lonnermark, Elisabet and Nowrouzinan, Forough and Adlerberth, Ingegerd and Ahrné, Siv and Wold, Agnes and Friman, Vanda},
  issn         = {1618-0607},
  keyword      = {Lactobacillus,IgA deficiency,Gut,Oral,Microbiota,Adhesion},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {53--60},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Medical Microbiology},
  title        = {Oral and faecal lactobacilli and their expression of mannose-specific adhesins in individuals with and without IgA deficiency},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmm.2011.08.004},
  volume       = {302},
  year         = {2012},
}