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Can histology solve the riddle of non-functioning electrodes; factors influencing the biocompatibillity of brain machine interfaces.

Eriksson Linsmeier, Cecilia LU ; Thelin, Jonas LU and Danielsen, Nils LU (2011) In Progress in Brain Research 194. p.181-189
Abstract
Neural interfaces hold great promise to become invaluable clinical and diagnostic tools in the

near future. However, the biocompatibility and the long-term stability of the implanted interfaces are far

from optimized. There are several factors that need to be addressed and standardized when improving

the long-term success of an implanted electrode. We have chosen to focus on three key factors when

evaluating the evoked tissue responses after electrode implantation into the brain: implant size,

fixation mode, and evaluation period. Further, we show results from an ultrathin multichannel wire

electrode that has been implanted in the rat cerebral cortex for 1 year.

To improve... (More)
Neural interfaces hold great promise to become invaluable clinical and diagnostic tools in the

near future. However, the biocompatibility and the long-term stability of the implanted interfaces are far

from optimized. There are several factors that need to be addressed and standardized when improving

the long-term success of an implanted electrode. We have chosen to focus on three key factors when

evaluating the evoked tissue responses after electrode implantation into the brain: implant size,

fixation mode, and evaluation period. Further, we show results from an ultrathin multichannel wire

electrode that has been implanted in the rat cerebral cortex for 1 year.

To improve biocompatibility of implanted electrodes, we would like to suggest that free-floating, very

small, flexible, and, in time, wireless electrodes would elicit a diminished cell encapsulation. We would

also like to suggest standardized methods for the electrode design, the electrode implantation method,

and the analyses of cell reactions after implantation into the CNS in order to improve the long-term

success of implanted neural interfaces. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cell morphology, brain, electrode, neural cell, micromotion, cell encapsulation
in
Progress in Brain Research
editor
Schouenborg, Jens; Danielsen, Nils; Garwicz, Martin; ; and
volume
194
pages
181 - 189
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000311038900014
  • scopus:80051884223
ISSN
0079-6123
DOI
10.1016/B978-0-444-53815-4.00008-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26c9ec89-7416-4e93-b83b-bc6211643d1e (old id 2335208)
date added to LUP
2012-01-31 14:07:30
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:35:20
@inbook{26c9ec89-7416-4e93-b83b-bc6211643d1e,
  abstract     = {Neural interfaces hold great promise to become invaluable clinical and diagnostic tools in the<br/><br>
near future. However, the biocompatibility and the long-term stability of the implanted interfaces are far<br/><br>
from optimized. There are several factors that need to be addressed and standardized when improving<br/><br>
the long-term success of an implanted electrode. We have chosen to focus on three key factors when<br/><br>
evaluating the evoked tissue responses after electrode implantation into the brain: implant size,<br/><br>
fixation mode, and evaluation period. Further, we show results from an ultrathin multichannel wire<br/><br>
electrode that has been implanted in the rat cerebral cortex for 1 year.<br/><br>
To improve biocompatibility of implanted electrodes, we would like to suggest that free-floating, very<br/><br>
small, flexible, and, in time, wireless electrodes would elicit a diminished cell encapsulation. We would<br/><br>
also like to suggest standardized methods for the electrode design, the electrode implantation method,<br/><br>
and the analyses of cell reactions after implantation into the CNS in order to improve the long-term<br/><br>
success of implanted neural interfaces.},
  author       = {Eriksson Linsmeier, Cecilia and Thelin, Jonas and Danielsen, Nils},
  editor       = {Schouenborg, Jens and Danielsen, Nils and Garwicz, Martin},
  issn         = {0079-6123},
  keyword      = {cell morphology,brain,electrode,neural cell,micromotion,cell encapsulation},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {181--189},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Progress in Brain Research},
  title        = {Can histology solve the riddle of non-functioning electrodes; factors influencing the biocompatibillity of brain machine interfaces.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-53815-4.00008-X},
  volume       = {194},
  year         = {2011},
}