Advanced

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

Löndahl, Magnus LU (2012) In Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews 28(Suppl. 1). p.78-84
Abstract
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) could be described as a short-term, high-dose oxygen inhalation and diffusion therapy, delivered systemically through airways and blood, achieved by having the patient breathing concentrated oxygen at a pressure higher than 1 absolute atmosphere. In clinical practice, monoplace or multiplace hyperbaric chambers are used to achieve this. Treatment is usually given as daily 90- to 120-min-long HBO sessions at pressures between 2.0 and 2.5 absolute atmosphere, aiming for 3040 treatment sessions. The use of HBO as treatment of diabetic foot ulcers has been founded on weak scientific ground, although the outcomes from previous studies are in concert with the conclusions from preclinical studies and supports the... (More)
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) could be described as a short-term, high-dose oxygen inhalation and diffusion therapy, delivered systemically through airways and blood, achieved by having the patient breathing concentrated oxygen at a pressure higher than 1 absolute atmosphere. In clinical practice, monoplace or multiplace hyperbaric chambers are used to achieve this. Treatment is usually given as daily 90- to 120-min-long HBO sessions at pressures between 2.0 and 2.5 absolute atmosphere, aiming for 3040 treatment sessions. The use of HBO as treatment of diabetic foot ulcers has been founded on weak scientific ground, although the outcomes from previous studies are in concert with the conclusions from preclinical studies and supports the theoretical framework of HBO reversing hypoxia-induced pathology. Two well-designed randomized double-blind trials have put HBO on firmer ground and may justify adjunctive HBO treatment to a selected group of patients with nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers. Some health economic studies suggest potential cost effectiveness, but these studies are limited by deficient primary clinical data and should be interpreted with caution. Several issues remain to be addressed, such as developing robust criteria to improve treatment protocols, determining which patients are likely to benefit, and when to start and stop treatment. Copyright (C) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
diabetes, foot ulcer, hyperbaric oxygen, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, healing, review
in
Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews
volume
28
issue
Suppl. 1
pages
78 - 84
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000299377700015
  • pmid:22271728
  • scopus:84856192847
ISSN
1520-7552
DOI
10.1002/dmrr.2256
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f359102c-a54b-448b-b306-65d917d03aa8 (old id 2348798)
date added to LUP
2012-03-01 11:24:17
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:10:49
@article{f359102c-a54b-448b-b306-65d917d03aa8,
  abstract     = {Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) could be described as a short-term, high-dose oxygen inhalation and diffusion therapy, delivered systemically through airways and blood, achieved by having the patient breathing concentrated oxygen at a pressure higher than 1 absolute atmosphere. In clinical practice, monoplace or multiplace hyperbaric chambers are used to achieve this. Treatment is usually given as daily 90- to 120-min-long HBO sessions at pressures between 2.0 and 2.5 absolute atmosphere, aiming for 3040 treatment sessions. The use of HBO as treatment of diabetic foot ulcers has been founded on weak scientific ground, although the outcomes from previous studies are in concert with the conclusions from preclinical studies and supports the theoretical framework of HBO reversing hypoxia-induced pathology. Two well-designed randomized double-blind trials have put HBO on firmer ground and may justify adjunctive HBO treatment to a selected group of patients with nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers. Some health economic studies suggest potential cost effectiveness, but these studies are limited by deficient primary clinical data and should be interpreted with caution. Several issues remain to be addressed, such as developing robust criteria to improve treatment protocols, determining which patients are likely to benefit, and when to start and stop treatment. Copyright (C) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Löndahl, Magnus},
  issn         = {1520-7552},
  keyword      = {diabetes,foot ulcer,hyperbaric oxygen,hyperbaric oxygen therapy,healing,review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl. 1},
  pages        = {78--84},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews},
  title        = {Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as treatment of diabetic foot ulcers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.2256},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2012},
}