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Evaluation of Plasma A beta as Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease in Older Individuals Without Dementia: A Population-Based Study

Hansson, Oskar LU ; Stomrud, Erik LU ; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Ostling, Svante; Gustafson, Deborah R.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj and Skoog, Ingmar (2012) In Journal of Alzheimer's Disease 28(1). p.231-238
Abstract
Amyloid-beta (A beta) pathology is a major component in the mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease (AD). Measurement of A beta(42) in cerebrospinal fluid predicts cognitive decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identifies AD in patients with dementia. However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory. In this prospective population-based study, plasma A beta(42) and A beta(40) were measured at baseline in 730 adults aged 70 years or older and without dementia. After five years, plasma levels were analyzed again and participants were assessed for development of dementia. During follow-up, 53 individuals (7%) developed dementia of which 37 (5%) were classified as AD. No difference in baseline plasma A beta(42), A... (More)
Amyloid-beta (A beta) pathology is a major component in the mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease (AD). Measurement of A beta(42) in cerebrospinal fluid predicts cognitive decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identifies AD in patients with dementia. However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory. In this prospective population-based study, plasma A beta(42) and A beta(40) were measured at baseline in 730 adults aged 70 years or older and without dementia. After five years, plasma levels were analyzed again and participants were assessed for development of dementia. During follow-up, 53 individuals (7%) developed dementia of which 37 (5%) were classified as AD. No difference in baseline plasma A beta(42), A beta(40), or A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio levels were observed between converters to dementia or AD compared to the cognitively stable individuals. However, individuals with plasma A beta(40) levels above the median level for the group at baseline had an increased risk of developing dementia and AD during the follow-up, even after adjustment for age, gender, APOE genotype, and educational level (odds ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.0-4.7, p < 0.05). Neither plasma A beta(42) nor the A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio influenced the risk of developing dementia or AD. Moreover, A beta(42) and A beta(40) levels increased over the 5 years, whereas the A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio decreased (p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study suggests that measurement of plasma A beta should not be used clinically to predict dementia or AD. However, plasma A beta(40) may possibly be regarded as a moderate risk marker comparable to other risk markers for AD such as first-degree family history of dementia. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-beta 40, amyloid-beta 42, biological, markers, cohort studies, dementia, plasma
in
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
volume
28
issue
1
pages
231 - 238
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000299311900020
  • scopus:84855759192
ISSN
1387-2877
DOI
10.3233/JAD-2011-111418
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
db6919d5-c678-4189-ae72-9ca5c7b1ea16 (old id 2355076)
date added to LUP
2012-03-01 11:25:33
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:15:45
@article{db6919d5-c678-4189-ae72-9ca5c7b1ea16,
  abstract     = {Amyloid-beta (A beta) pathology is a major component in the mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease (AD). Measurement of A beta(42) in cerebrospinal fluid predicts cognitive decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identifies AD in patients with dementia. However, studies on A beta in plasma are contradictory. In this prospective population-based study, plasma A beta(42) and A beta(40) were measured at baseline in 730 adults aged 70 years or older and without dementia. After five years, plasma levels were analyzed again and participants were assessed for development of dementia. During follow-up, 53 individuals (7%) developed dementia of which 37 (5%) were classified as AD. No difference in baseline plasma A beta(42), A beta(40), or A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio levels were observed between converters to dementia or AD compared to the cognitively stable individuals. However, individuals with plasma A beta(40) levels above the median level for the group at baseline had an increased risk of developing dementia and AD during the follow-up, even after adjustment for age, gender, APOE genotype, and educational level (odds ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.0-4.7, p &lt; 0.05). Neither plasma A beta(42) nor the A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio influenced the risk of developing dementia or AD. Moreover, A beta(42) and A beta(40) levels increased over the 5 years, whereas the A beta(42)/A beta(40) ratio decreased (p &lt; 0.001). In conclusion, this study suggests that measurement of plasma A beta should not be used clinically to predict dementia or AD. However, plasma A beta(40) may possibly be regarded as a moderate risk marker comparable to other risk markers for AD such as first-degree family history of dementia.},
  author       = {Hansson, Oskar and Stomrud, Erik and Vanmechelen, Eugeen and Ostling, Svante and Gustafson, Deborah R. and Zetterberg, Henrik and Blennow, Kaj and Skoog, Ingmar},
  issn         = {1387-2877},
  keyword      = {Alzheimer's disease,amyloid-beta 40,amyloid-beta 42,biological,markers,cohort studies,dementia,plasma},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {231--238},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Alzheimer's Disease},
  title        = {Evaluation of Plasma A beta as Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease in Older Individuals Without Dementia: A Population-Based Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2011-111418},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2012},
}