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Association between Subcortical Lesions and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

Palmqvist, Sebastian LU ; Sarwari, Agmall; Wattmo, Carina LU ; Bronge, Lena; Zhang, Yi; Wahlund, Lars Olof and Nägga, Katarina LU (2011) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 32(6). p.417-423
Abstract
Background/Aims: The most devastating features of Alz-heimer's disease (AD) are often the behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). There is controversy as to whether subcortical lesions contribute to BPSD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BPSD and subcortical lesions (white-matter lesions and lacunes) in AD.



Methods: CT or MRI from 259 patients with mild-to-moderate AD were assessed with the Age-Related White Matter Changes scale. Linear measures of global and temporal atrophy and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were used to adjust for AD pathology and disease severity in logistic regression models with the BPSD items delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression,... (More)
Background/Aims: The most devastating features of Alz-heimer's disease (AD) are often the behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). There is controversy as to whether subcortical lesions contribute to BPSD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BPSD and subcortical lesions (white-matter lesions and lacunes) in AD.



Methods: CT or MRI from 259 patients with mild-to-moderate AD were assessed with the Age-Related White Matter Changes scale. Linear measures of global and temporal atrophy and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were used to adjust for AD pathology and disease severity in logistic regression models with the BPSD items delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy and irritability.



Results: Lacunes in the left basal ganglia were asso-ciated with delusions (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.21-5.48) and hallucinations (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.38-8.01) and lacunes in the right basal ganglia were associated with depression (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.01-4.51).



Conclusion: Lacunes in the basal ganglia resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of delusions, hallucinations and depression, when adjusting for cognition and atrophy. This suggests that basal ganglia lesions can contribute to BPSD in patients with AD, independently of the AD process. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
32
issue
6
pages
417 - 423
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000300364500007
  • pmid:22343788
  • scopus:84862803711
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000335778
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2236d919-af33-49d4-8ec7-f779aaf1d09f (old id 2366751)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343788?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-03-02 12:22:42
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:15:07
@article{2236d919-af33-49d4-8ec7-f779aaf1d09f,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: The most devastating features of Alz-heimer's disease (AD) are often the behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia (BPSD). There is controversy as to whether subcortical lesions contribute to BPSD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BPSD and subcortical lesions (white-matter lesions and lacunes) in AD. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods: CT or MRI from 259 patients with mild-to-moderate AD were assessed with the Age-Related White Matter Changes scale. Linear measures of global and temporal atrophy and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were used to adjust for AD pathology and disease severity in logistic regression models with the BPSD items delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy and irritability. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Lacunes in the left basal ganglia were asso-ciated with delusions (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.21-5.48) and hallucinations (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.38-8.01) and lacunes in the right basal ganglia were associated with depression (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.01-4.51). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: Lacunes in the basal ganglia resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of delusions, hallucinations and depression, when adjusting for cognition and atrophy. This suggests that basal ganglia lesions can contribute to BPSD in patients with AD, independently of the AD process.},
  author       = {Palmqvist, Sebastian and Sarwari, Agmall and Wattmo, Carina and Bronge, Lena and Zhang, Yi and Wahlund, Lars Olof and Nägga, Katarina},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {417--423},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Association between Subcortical Lesions and Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000335778},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2011},
}