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Increased Mortality Of Naive Varanid Lizards After The Invasion Of Non-Native Cane Toads (Bufo Marinus)

Ujvari, Beata and Madsen, Thomas LU (2009) In Herpetological Conservation and Biology 4(2). p.248-251
Abstract
Exotic animal and plant species introduced into the Australian continent often imparted catastrophic effects on the indigenous fauna and flora. Proponents of biological control introduced the South American Cane Toad (Bufo marinus) into the sugar cane fields of Queensland in 1935. The Cane Toad is one of the most toxic bufonids, and when seized by naive Australian predators, the toxin usually kills the attacker. One group of Australian squamate reptiles that are very susceptible to Cane Toad toxins is varanid lizards. Prior to Cane Toad invasion of our study area, the Adelaide River floodplain of the Northern Territory of Australia, annual mortality of adult male radio-tagged Yellow-spotted Goannas (Varanus panoptes) was very low (two... (More)
Exotic animal and plant species introduced into the Australian continent often imparted catastrophic effects on the indigenous fauna and flora. Proponents of biological control introduced the South American Cane Toad (Bufo marinus) into the sugar cane fields of Queensland in 1935. The Cane Toad is one of the most toxic bufonids, and when seized by naive Australian predators, the toxin usually kills the attacker. One group of Australian squamate reptiles that are very susceptible to Cane Toad toxins is varanid lizards. Prior to Cane Toad invasion of our study area, the Adelaide River floodplain of the Northern Territory of Australia, annual mortality of adult male radio-tagged Yellow-spotted Goannas (Varanus panoptes) was very low (two deaths recorded among 20 lizards over three years). After the arrival of the toads in October 2005, all radio-tracked goannas were found dead in August 2006 (nine out of nine lizards), most likely after attempting to feed on toads. Our results suggest that invasive Cane Toads place naive adult male Yellow-spotted Goannas at risk of possibly > 90% mortality. This increase in mortality could reduce the genetic diversity and hamper long-term survival of these large carnivorous lizards. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Goanna, Varanus panoptes, Australia, Yellow-spotted, naive predator mortality, Bufo marinus, Cane Toad
in
Herpetological Conservation and Biology
volume
4
issue
2
pages
248 - 251
publisher
Herpetological Conservation & Biology
external identifiers
  • wos:000207820100013
  • scopus:70349616142
ISSN
1931-7603
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9f6db212-e066-4d80-ac88-8894a41ced3f (old id 2376828)
alternative location
http://www.herpconbio.org/Volume_4/Issue_2/Ujvari_Madsen_2009.pdf
date added to LUP
2012-03-27 09:56:00
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:17:34
@article{9f6db212-e066-4d80-ac88-8894a41ced3f,
  abstract     = {Exotic animal and plant species introduced into the Australian continent often imparted catastrophic effects on the indigenous fauna and flora. Proponents of biological control introduced the South American Cane Toad (Bufo marinus) into the sugar cane fields of Queensland in 1935. The Cane Toad is one of the most toxic bufonids, and when seized by naive Australian predators, the toxin usually kills the attacker. One group of Australian squamate reptiles that are very susceptible to Cane Toad toxins is varanid lizards. Prior to Cane Toad invasion of our study area, the Adelaide River floodplain of the Northern Territory of Australia, annual mortality of adult male radio-tagged Yellow-spotted Goannas (Varanus panoptes) was very low (two deaths recorded among 20 lizards over three years). After the arrival of the toads in October 2005, all radio-tracked goannas were found dead in August 2006 (nine out of nine lizards), most likely after attempting to feed on toads. Our results suggest that invasive Cane Toads place naive adult male Yellow-spotted Goannas at risk of possibly > 90% mortality. This increase in mortality could reduce the genetic diversity and hamper long-term survival of these large carnivorous lizards.},
  author       = {Ujvari, Beata and Madsen, Thomas},
  issn         = {1931-7603},
  keyword      = {Goanna,Varanus panoptes,Australia,Yellow-spotted,naive predator mortality,Bufo marinus,Cane Toad},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {248--251},
  publisher    = {Herpetological Conservation & Biology},
  series       = {Herpetological Conservation and Biology},
  title        = {Increased Mortality Of Naive Varanid Lizards After The Invasion Of Non-Native Cane Toads (Bufo Marinus)},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2009},
}