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Lifestyle factors, self-reported health and sense of coherence among fathers/partners in relation to risk for depression and anxiety in early pregnancy

Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún LU and Persson, Eva K. LU (2018) In Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Abstract

Background: Father's health is important for mothers and unborn/newborn children and knowledge about expectant fathers’ health in relation to lifestyle and psychosocial aspects is essential. Aims: To determine sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, self-reported health and sense of coherence among fathers and partners in relation to their risk for depression and anxiety in early pregnancy. Methods: A cross-sectional design, descriptive statistics, chi-squared analysis, T-test, binary logistic regression, multiple logistic regression with OR and 95% CI were used. Results: A total of 532 prospective fathers/partners constituted the cohort (mean age 31.55, SD 5.47 years). Nearly, one in ten (9.8%) had a statistically high risk for... (More)

Background: Father's health is important for mothers and unborn/newborn children and knowledge about expectant fathers’ health in relation to lifestyle and psychosocial aspects is essential. Aims: To determine sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, self-reported health and sense of coherence among fathers and partners in relation to their risk for depression and anxiety in early pregnancy. Methods: A cross-sectional design, descriptive statistics, chi-squared analysis, T-test, binary logistic regression, multiple logistic regression with OR and 95% CI were used. Results: A total of 532 prospective fathers/partners constituted the cohort (mean age 31.55, SD 5.47 years). Nearly, one in ten (9.8%) had a statistically high risk for depression; mainly those who were unemployed (p = 0.043), had financial distress (0.001), reported ‘very or fairly bad’ health (p = 0.002), had a ‘very or fairly bad’ sexual satisfaction (p = 0.006) and scored low on the SOC scale (p < 0.001). They smoked more often (p = 0.003) were hazardous users of alcohol (p = 0.001) and slept with difficulties (p = 0.001). Those with sleeping difficulties were 5.7 times more likely to have several symptoms of depression (p = 0.001). Hazardous users of alcohol and smokers had 3.1 respectively 3.0 times higher risk for depression (p = 0.001 respectively 0.003). The single strongest risk factor was a low score on the SOC-scale which gave 10.6 (AOR 10.6; 95% CI 5.4–20.6) higher risk for depression. High-anxiety ‘just now’ was reported by 8.9% and ‘in general’ by 7.9%, and those who had sleeping difficulties reported ‘very or fairly bad’ health (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Allocating more resources and introducing more family-focused care with depression and anxiety screening in early pregnancy for both expecting parents at antenatal care should be strongly considered by actors and policymakers, as this is a step in maintaining a family's well-being.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
anxiety, cross-sectional study, depression, father/partner, lifestyle, pregnancy, sense of coherence
in
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85059030954
ISSN
0283-9318
DOI
10.1111/scs.12641
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
23a3d4cd-1c3d-4514-aab3-b1483f241359
date added to LUP
2019-01-07 13:34:37
date last changed
2019-01-08 03:00:02
@article{23a3d4cd-1c3d-4514-aab3-b1483f241359,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Father's health is important for mothers and unborn/newborn children and knowledge about expectant fathers’ health in relation to lifestyle and psychosocial aspects is essential. Aims: To determine sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, self-reported health and sense of coherence among fathers and partners in relation to their risk for depression and anxiety in early pregnancy. Methods: A cross-sectional design, descriptive statistics, chi-squared analysis, T-test, binary logistic regression, multiple logistic regression with OR and 95% CI were used. Results: A total of 532 prospective fathers/partners constituted the cohort (mean age 31.55, SD 5.47 years). Nearly, one in ten (9.8%) had a statistically high risk for depression; mainly those who were unemployed (p = 0.043), had financial distress (0.001), reported ‘very or fairly bad’ health (p = 0.002), had a ‘very or fairly bad’ sexual satisfaction (p = 0.006) and scored low on the SOC scale (p &lt; 0.001). They smoked more often (p = 0.003) were hazardous users of alcohol (p = 0.001) and slept with difficulties (p = 0.001). Those with sleeping difficulties were 5.7 times more likely to have several symptoms of depression (p = 0.001). Hazardous users of alcohol and smokers had 3.1 respectively 3.0 times higher risk for depression (p = 0.001 respectively 0.003). The single strongest risk factor was a low score on the SOC-scale which gave 10.6 (AOR 10.6; 95% CI 5.4–20.6) higher risk for depression. High-anxiety ‘just now’ was reported by 8.9% and ‘in general’ by 7.9%, and those who had sleeping difficulties reported ‘very or fairly bad’ health (p &lt; 0.001). Conclusions: Allocating more resources and introducing more family-focused care with depression and anxiety screening in early pregnancy for both expecting parents at antenatal care should be strongly considered by actors and policymakers, as this is a step in maintaining a family's well-being.</p>},
  author       = {Finnbogadóttir, Hafrún and Persson, Eva K.},
  issn         = {0283-9318},
  keyword      = {anxiety,cross-sectional study,depression,father/partner,lifestyle,pregnancy,sense of coherence},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences},
  title        = {Lifestyle factors, self-reported health and sense of coherence among fathers/partners in relation to risk for depression and anxiety in early pregnancy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scs.12641},
  year         = {2018},
}