Advanced

An International Cohort Study of Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Bernatsky, S; Boivin, J F; Joseph, L; Rajan, R; Zoma, A; Manzi, S; Ginzler, E; Urowitz, M; Gladman, D and Fortin, P R, et al. (2005) In Arthritis and Rheumatism 52(5). p.1481-1490
Abstract
Objective. There is increasing evidence in support of an association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and malignancy, but in earlier studies the association could not be quantified precisely. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence of cancer in SLE patients, compared with that in the general population. Methods. We assembled a multisite (23 centers) international cohort of patients diagnosed as having SLE. Patients at each center were linked to regional tumor registries to determine cancer occurrence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers. Cancers expected were determined by multiplying person-years in the cohort by the geographically matched age,... (More)
Objective. There is increasing evidence in support of an association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and malignancy, but in earlier studies the association could not be quantified precisely. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence of cancer in SLE patients, compared with that in the general population. Methods. We assembled a multisite (23 centers) international cohort of patients diagnosed as having SLE. Patients at each center were linked to regional tumor registries to determine cancer occurrence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers. Cancers expected were determined by multiplying person-years in the cohort by the geographically matched age, sex, and calendar year-specific cancer rates, and summing over all person-years. Results. The 9,547 patients from 23 centers were observed for a total of 76,948 patient-years, with an average followup of 8 years. Within the observation interval, 431 cancers occurred. The data confirmed an increased risk of cancer among patients with SLE. For all cancers combined, the SIR estimate was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05-1.27), for all hematologic malignancies, it was 2.75 (95% CI 2.13-3.49), and for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, it was 3.64 (95% CI 2.63-4.93). The data also suggested an increased risk of lung cancer (SIR 1.37; 95% CI 1.05-1.76), and hepatobiliary cancer (SIR 2.60; 95% CI 1.25, 4.78). Conclusion. These results support the notion of an association between SLE and cancer and more precisely define the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in SLE. It is not yet known whether this association is mediated by genetic factors or exogenous exposures. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis and Rheumatism
volume
52
issue
5
pages
1481 - 1490
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:15880596
  • wos:000229004600018
  • scopus:20844443482
ISSN
1529-0131
DOI
10.1002/art.21029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f47c542a-f52e-4ab1-97ba-257ea6628725 (old id 240614)
date added to LUP
2007-08-02 12:02:59
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:50:26
@article{f47c542a-f52e-4ab1-97ba-257ea6628725,
  abstract     = {Objective. There is increasing evidence in support of an association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and malignancy, but in earlier studies the association could not be quantified precisely. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the incidence of cancer in SLE patients, compared with that in the general population. Methods. We assembled a multisite (23 centers) international cohort of patients diagnosed as having SLE. Patients at each center were linked to regional tumor registries to determine cancer occurrence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers. Cancers expected were determined by multiplying person-years in the cohort by the geographically matched age, sex, and calendar year-specific cancer rates, and summing over all person-years. Results. The 9,547 patients from 23 centers were observed for a total of 76,948 patient-years, with an average followup of 8 years. Within the observation interval, 431 cancers occurred. The data confirmed an increased risk of cancer among patients with SLE. For all cancers combined, the SIR estimate was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05-1.27), for all hematologic malignancies, it was 2.75 (95% CI 2.13-3.49), and for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, it was 3.64 (95% CI 2.63-4.93). The data also suggested an increased risk of lung cancer (SIR 1.37; 95% CI 1.05-1.76), and hepatobiliary cancer (SIR 2.60; 95% CI 1.25, 4.78). Conclusion. These results support the notion of an association between SLE and cancer and more precisely define the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in SLE. It is not yet known whether this association is mediated by genetic factors or exogenous exposures.},
  author       = {Bernatsky, S and Boivin, J F and Joseph, L and Rajan, R and Zoma, A and Manzi, S and Ginzler, E and Urowitz, M and Gladman, D and Fortin, P R and Petri, M and Edworthy, S and Barr, S and Gordon, C and Bae, S C and Sibley, J and Isenberg, D and Rahman, A and Aranow, C and Dooley, M A and Steinsson, K and Nived, Ola and Sturfelt, Gunnar and Alarcon, G and Senecal, J L and Zummer, M and Hanly, J and Ensworth, S and Pope, J and El-Gabalawy, H and McCarthy, T and Pierre, Y S and Ramsey-Goldman, R and Clarke, A},
  issn         = {1529-0131},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1481--1490},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis and Rheumatism},
  title        = {An International Cohort Study of Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.21029},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2005},
}