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Short-and long term niche segregation and individual specialization of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in species poor Faroese lakes

Brodersen, Jakob LU ; Malmquist, Hilmar J.; Landkildehus, Frank; Lauridsen, Torben L.; Amsinck, Susanne L.; Bjerring, Rikke; Sondergaard, Martin; Johansson, Liselotte S.; Christoffersen, Kirsten S. and Jeppesen, Erik (2012) In Environmental Biology of Fishes 93(3). p.305-318
Abstract
Trophic niche divergence is considered to be a major process by which species coexistence is facilitated. When studying niche segregation in lake ecosystems, we tend to view the niche on a one-dimensional pelagic-littoral axis. In reality, however, the niche use may be more complex and individual fidelity to a niche may be variable both between and within populations. In order to study this complexity, relative simple systems with few species are needed. In this paper, we study how competitor presence affects the resource use of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in 11 species-poor Faroese lakes by comparing relative abundance, stable isotope ratios and diet in multiple habitats. In the presence of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus... (More)
Trophic niche divergence is considered to be a major process by which species coexistence is facilitated. When studying niche segregation in lake ecosystems, we tend to view the niche on a one-dimensional pelagic-littoral axis. In reality, however, the niche use may be more complex and individual fidelity to a niche may be variable both between and within populations. In order to study this complexity, relative simple systems with few species are needed. In this paper, we study how competitor presence affects the resource use of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in 11 species-poor Faroese lakes by comparing relative abundance, stable isotope ratios and diet in multiple habitats. In the presence of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a higher proportion of the trout population was found in the pelagic habitat, and trout in general relied on a more pelagic diet base as compared to trout living in allopatry or in sympatry with Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). Diet analyses revealed, however, that niche-segregation may be more complex than described on a one-dimensional pelagic-littoral axis. Trout from both littoral and offshore benthic habitats had in the presence of sticklebacks a less benthic diet as compared to trout living in allopatry or in sympatry with charr. Furthermore, we found individual habitat specialization between littoral/benthic and pelagic trout in deep lakes. Hence, our findings indicate that for trout populations interspecific competition can drive shifts in both habitat and niche use, but at the same time they illustrate the complexity of the ecological niche in freshwater ecosystems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Niche complexity, Stable isotopes, Trout, Stickleback, Aquatic ecology, Faroe Islands
in
Environmental Biology of Fishes
volume
93
issue
3
pages
305 - 318
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000299768600001
  • scopus:84856239094
ISSN
0378-1909
DOI
10.1007/s10641-011-9914-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
18c0b680-abac-4d32-a5a0-b8e4e64609d0 (old id 2409813)
date added to LUP
2012-03-28 11:17:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:02:30
@article{18c0b680-abac-4d32-a5a0-b8e4e64609d0,
  abstract     = {Trophic niche divergence is considered to be a major process by which species coexistence is facilitated. When studying niche segregation in lake ecosystems, we tend to view the niche on a one-dimensional pelagic-littoral axis. In reality, however, the niche use may be more complex and individual fidelity to a niche may be variable both between and within populations. In order to study this complexity, relative simple systems with few species are needed. In this paper, we study how competitor presence affects the resource use of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in 11 species-poor Faroese lakes by comparing relative abundance, stable isotope ratios and diet in multiple habitats. In the presence of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a higher proportion of the trout population was found in the pelagic habitat, and trout in general relied on a more pelagic diet base as compared to trout living in allopatry or in sympatry with Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). Diet analyses revealed, however, that niche-segregation may be more complex than described on a one-dimensional pelagic-littoral axis. Trout from both littoral and offshore benthic habitats had in the presence of sticklebacks a less benthic diet as compared to trout living in allopatry or in sympatry with charr. Furthermore, we found individual habitat specialization between littoral/benthic and pelagic trout in deep lakes. Hence, our findings indicate that for trout populations interspecific competition can drive shifts in both habitat and niche use, but at the same time they illustrate the complexity of the ecological niche in freshwater ecosystems.},
  author       = {Brodersen, Jakob and Malmquist, Hilmar J. and Landkildehus, Frank and Lauridsen, Torben L. and Amsinck, Susanne L. and Bjerring, Rikke and Sondergaard, Martin and Johansson, Liselotte S. and Christoffersen, Kirsten S. and Jeppesen, Erik},
  issn         = {0378-1909},
  keyword      = {Niche complexity,Stable isotopes,Trout,Stickleback,Aquatic ecology,Faroe Islands},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {305--318},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Environmental Biology of Fishes},
  title        = {Short-and long term niche segregation and individual specialization of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in species poor Faroese lakes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-011-9914-z},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2012},
}