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Effects of analytical and experiential self-focus on post-event processing after a stress induction in social anxiety disorder: A pilot study

Nilsson, Jan-Erik LU ; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar LU and Viborg, Gardar LU (2012) In Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 41(4). p.310-320
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

According to cognitive models, negative post-event processing rumination is a key maintaining factor in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Analogue research has supported the differentiation of self-focus into different modes of self-focused attention with distinct effects on rumination in depression and social anxiety. The purpose of this study was to replicate these effects with a sample of clients with SAD (N = 12) using (a) an experimental, cross-over design and (b) an evaluation situation (impromptu speech) prior to manipulation. Processing an identical list of symptoms, half of a sample was asked to successively adopt an analytic (abstract, evaluative) and an experiential (concrete,... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

According to cognitive models, negative post-event processing rumination is a key maintaining factor in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Analogue research has supported the differentiation of self-focus into different modes of self-focused attention with distinct effects on rumination in depression and social anxiety. The purpose of this study was to replicate these effects with a sample of clients with SAD (N = 12) using (a) an experimental, cross-over design and (b) an evaluation situation (impromptu speech) prior to manipulation. Processing an identical list of symptoms, half of a sample was asked to successively adopt an analytic (abstract, evaluative) and an experiential (concrete, process-focused) self-focus; the other half employed the modes in the reversed order. Effects were assessed with a thought-listing (TL) procedure. As predicted, the two modes of self-focused attention affected cognitions differently; participants in the experiential condition showed a tendency for a decreased proportion of negative thoughts, whereas those in the analytical condition reported a decreased proportion of neutral thoughts. No difference was shown on positive cognitions. Furthermore, the participants' self-evaluation following the speech predicted their degree of subsequent negative thinking. After self-focus inductions, however, this effect was only seen in those participants who started by receiving the analytical self-focus induction. The results support previous findings that the analytical and the experiential self-focus modes affect cognitions differently, and that experiential processing may have beneficial effects on rumination in SAD. However, results need to be replicated in a larger sample. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social anxiety disorder, self-focus, analytical, experiential, cognitions
in
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
volume
41
issue
4
pages
310 - 320
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:22536750
  • scopus:84876156965
ISSN
1651-2316
DOI
10.1080/16506073.2012.682088
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4c64fd54-91f7-41a8-9561-abb1a72e43f5 (old id 2429783)
date added to LUP
2012-03-30 13:58:41
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:03:01
@article{4c64fd54-91f7-41a8-9561-abb1a72e43f5,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
According to cognitive models, negative post-event processing rumination is a key maintaining factor in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Analogue research has supported the differentiation of self-focus into different modes of self-focused attention with distinct effects on rumination in depression and social anxiety. The purpose of this study was to replicate these effects with a sample of clients with SAD (N = 12) using (a) an experimental, cross-over design and (b) an evaluation situation (impromptu speech) prior to manipulation. Processing an identical list of symptoms, half of a sample was asked to successively adopt an analytic (abstract, evaluative) and an experiential (concrete, process-focused) self-focus; the other half employed the modes in the reversed order. Effects were assessed with a thought-listing (TL) procedure. As predicted, the two modes of self-focused attention affected cognitions differently; participants in the experiential condition showed a tendency for a decreased proportion of negative thoughts, whereas those in the analytical condition reported a decreased proportion of neutral thoughts. No difference was shown on positive cognitions. Furthermore, the participants' self-evaluation following the speech predicted their degree of subsequent negative thinking. After self-focus inductions, however, this effect was only seen in those participants who started by receiving the analytical self-focus induction. The results support previous findings that the analytical and the experiential self-focus modes affect cognitions differently, and that experiential processing may have beneficial effects on rumination in SAD. However, results need to be replicated in a larger sample.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Jan-Erik and Lundh, Lars-Gunnar and Viborg, Gardar},
  issn         = {1651-2316},
  keyword      = {social anxiety disorder,self-focus,analytical,experiential,cognitions},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {310--320},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Cognitive Behaviour Therapy},
  title        = {Effects of analytical and experiential self-focus on post-event processing after a stress induction in social anxiety disorder: A pilot study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16506073.2012.682088},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2012},
}