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Treatment of endoleaks: techniques and outcome.

Resch, Tim LU and Dias, Nuno LU (2012) In Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 53(1). p.91-99
Abstract
Endoleaks are one of the most common reasons for reinterventions and failure after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Current classifications divide endoleaks into type I-V but a more pragmatic definition is of direct and indirect endoleaks. Direct endoleaks (type I and III) transmit direct systemic pressure to the aneurysm sac and carry a high risk of aneurysm growth and rupture if left untreated. Immediate intervention is generally warranted. Indirect endoleaks (type II, IV, V) may have a more benign course and should be treated only under the presence of aneurysm growth. Appropriate procedural planning and device selection is critical to avoid endoleaks and most direct endoleaks can be identified and treated periprocedurally by use of... (More)
Endoleaks are one of the most common reasons for reinterventions and failure after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Current classifications divide endoleaks into type I-V but a more pragmatic definition is of direct and indirect endoleaks. Direct endoleaks (type I and III) transmit direct systemic pressure to the aneurysm sac and carry a high risk of aneurysm growth and rupture if left untreated. Immediate intervention is generally warranted. Indirect endoleaks (type II, IV, V) may have a more benign course and should be treated only under the presence of aneurysm growth. Appropriate procedural planning and device selection is critical to avoid endoleaks and most direct endoleaks can be identified and treated periprocedurally by use of high quality intraoperative imaging techniques. Late endoleaks can be treated predominately by endovascular means and the need for conversion to open surgery is rare. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery
volume
53
issue
1
pages
91 - 99
publisher
Edizioni Minerva Medica
external identifiers
  • wos:000303082800012
  • pmid:22433728
  • scopus:84860742267
ISSN
0021-9509
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cf47171f-4e7a-4f65-8bbd-b7f22c37ae57 (old id 2431464)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22433728?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 13:39:58
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:45:49
@article{cf47171f-4e7a-4f65-8bbd-b7f22c37ae57,
  abstract     = {Endoleaks are one of the most common reasons for reinterventions and failure after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Current classifications divide endoleaks into type I-V but a more pragmatic definition is of direct and indirect endoleaks. Direct endoleaks (type I and III) transmit direct systemic pressure to the aneurysm sac and carry a high risk of aneurysm growth and rupture if left untreated. Immediate intervention is generally warranted. Indirect endoleaks (type II, IV, V) may have a more benign course and should be treated only under the presence of aneurysm growth. Appropriate procedural planning and device selection is critical to avoid endoleaks and most direct endoleaks can be identified and treated periprocedurally by use of high quality intraoperative imaging techniques. Late endoleaks can be treated predominately by endovascular means and the need for conversion to open surgery is rare.},
  author       = {Resch, Tim and Dias, Nuno},
  issn         = {0021-9509},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {91--99},
  publisher    = {Edizioni Minerva Medica},
  series       = {Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery},
  title        = {Treatment of endoleaks: techniques and outcome.},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2012},
}