Advanced

Occupational Risk Factors for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: a Nationwide Study Based on Hospitalizations in Sweden.

Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Zöller, Bengt LU (2012) In Journal of Rheumatology 39(4). p.743-751
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible associations between occupation and hospitalization for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a nationwide study.



METHODS: A nationwide database was constructed in Sweden by linking the Swedish Census to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of SLE in adults during the study period (1970 to 2008). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% CI were calculated for different occupations. Two cohorts were defined based on occupational titles recorded in Swedish census data in 1970 and 1980.



RESULTS: A total of 8921 male and 42290 female hospitalizations for SLE were retrieved in individuals... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible associations between occupation and hospitalization for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a nationwide study.



METHODS: A nationwide database was constructed in Sweden by linking the Swedish Census to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of SLE in adults during the study period (1970 to 2008). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% CI were calculated for different occupations. Two cohorts were defined based on occupational titles recorded in Swedish census data in 1970 and 1980.



RESULTS: A total of 8921 male and 42290 female hospitalizations for SLE were retrieved in individuals aged over 15 years. High education (> 12 yrs) was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization for SLE among both women (SIR = 0.73) and men (SIR = 0.72). Among men with the same occupation in 2 consecutive censuses, increased risks (SIR) > 2.0 were present among artistic workers (2.52); shop managers and assistants (3.63); miners and quarry workers (6.04); shoe and leather workers (6.93); plumbers (2.21); other construction workers (2.08); glass, ceramic and tile workers (4.43); chimney sweeps (4.54); and military personnel (3.01). Among women with the same occupation in 2 consecutive censuses, no occupation was associated with SIR > 2.0.



CONCLUSION: Occupation may carry significantly increased risk of hospital admission for SLE. Especially among men, several occupations were associated with increased risks for SLE. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Rheumatology
volume
39
issue
4
pages
743 - 751
publisher
J Rheumatol Publ Co
external identifiers
  • wos:000302840800015
  • pmid:22382347
  • scopus:84859475501
ISSN
0315-162X
DOI
10.3899/jrheum.110789
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d43e2be0-d4a6-472a-a19a-b8ceb7b1ce51 (old id 2432335)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22382347?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 08:18:34
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:34:45
@article{d43e2be0-d4a6-472a-a19a-b8ceb7b1ce51,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible associations between occupation and hospitalization for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a nationwide study. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: A nationwide database was constructed in Sweden by linking the Swedish Census to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of SLE in adults during the study period (1970 to 2008). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% CI were calculated for different occupations. Two cohorts were defined based on occupational titles recorded in Swedish census data in 1970 and 1980. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: A total of 8921 male and 42290 female hospitalizations for SLE were retrieved in individuals aged over 15 years. High education (&gt; 12 yrs) was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization for SLE among both women (SIR = 0.73) and men (SIR = 0.72). Among men with the same occupation in 2 consecutive censuses, increased risks (SIR) &gt; 2.0 were present among artistic workers (2.52); shop managers and assistants (3.63); miners and quarry workers (6.04); shoe and leather workers (6.93); plumbers (2.21); other construction workers (2.08); glass, ceramic and tile workers (4.43); chimney sweeps (4.54); and military personnel (3.01). Among women with the same occupation in 2 consecutive censuses, no occupation was associated with SIR &gt; 2.0. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSION: Occupation may carry significantly increased risk of hospital admission for SLE. Especially among men, several occupations were associated with increased risks for SLE.},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina and Zöller, Bengt},
  issn         = {0315-162X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {743--751},
  publisher    = {J Rheumatol Publ Co},
  series       = {Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Occupational Risk Factors for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: a Nationwide Study Based on Hospitalizations in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.110789},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2012},
}