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Airborne particle deposition onto the ocular surface

Schneider, T and Bohgard, Mats LU (2005) In Indoor Air 15(3). p.215-219
Abstract
Eye irritation is one of the most frequently reported symptoms in relation to working in office-like environments. So far, no consistent association has been found between concentration of airborne particles and prevalence of eye irritation. External physical factors not hitherto considered could have a large influence on particle deposition velocity onto the ocular surface. This may have obscured the role airborne particles play. Based on previously published semi-empirical models, the paper describes the influence of turbulence, gravitational settling, electrical fields, and thermophoresis on deposition velocity. A probabilistic approach was used to determine percentile ranges in deposition velocity when the magnitude of these parameters... (More)
Eye irritation is one of the most frequently reported symptoms in relation to working in office-like environments. So far, no consistent association has been found between concentration of airborne particles and prevalence of eye irritation. External physical factors not hitherto considered could have a large influence on particle deposition velocity onto the ocular surface. This may have obscured the role airborne particles play. Based on previously published semi-empirical models, the paper describes the influence of turbulence, gravitational settling, electrical fields, and thermophoresis on deposition velocity. A probabilistic approach was used to determine percentile ranges in deposition velocity when the magnitude of these parameters varied within typical ranges. The calculations suggest that differences in external factors other than particle size may cause differences in the deposition velocity of one order of magnitude or more. Studies trying to find associations between airborne particle concentration levels and eye irritation should take into consideration the influence of external physical factors on deposition velocity. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
electric fields, diffusion, eye, particles, deposition, thermophoresis
in
Indoor Air
volume
15
issue
3
pages
215 - 219
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000228751500008
  • pmid:15865621
  • scopus:19044387536
ISSN
0905-6947
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0668.2005.00350.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
45e713f5-89fc-4605-a743-37d57a109536 (old id 244438)
date added to LUP
2007-08-06 09:11:31
date last changed
2017-04-23 04:25:37
@article{45e713f5-89fc-4605-a743-37d57a109536,
  abstract     = {Eye irritation is one of the most frequently reported symptoms in relation to working in office-like environments. So far, no consistent association has been found between concentration of airborne particles and prevalence of eye irritation. External physical factors not hitherto considered could have a large influence on particle deposition velocity onto the ocular surface. This may have obscured the role airborne particles play. Based on previously published semi-empirical models, the paper describes the influence of turbulence, gravitational settling, electrical fields, and thermophoresis on deposition velocity. A probabilistic approach was used to determine percentile ranges in deposition velocity when the magnitude of these parameters varied within typical ranges. The calculations suggest that differences in external factors other than particle size may cause differences in the deposition velocity of one order of magnitude or more. Studies trying to find associations between airborne particle concentration levels and eye irritation should take into consideration the influence of external physical factors on deposition velocity.},
  author       = {Schneider, T and Bohgard, Mats},
  issn         = {0905-6947},
  keyword      = {electric fields,diffusion,eye,particles,deposition,thermophoresis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {215--219},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Indoor Air},
  title        = {Airborne particle deposition onto the ocular surface},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2005.00350.x},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2005},
}