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Iron status influences trace element levels in human

Barany, E; Bergdahl, IA; Bratteby, LE; Lundh, Thomas LU ; Samuelson, G; Skerfving, Staffan LU and Oskarsson, A (2005) In Environmental Research 98(2). p.215-223
Abstract
Food is the main source of trace elements for the general Population. The gastrointestinal absorption of certain trace elements, e.g., cadmium, is strongly influenced by iron (Fe) status. This factor may also be relevant for the bioavailability of other trace elements. Therefore, we investigated relationships between Fe status indicators and trace element concentrations in blood and serum of 234 boys and girls at ages 15 and 17 years. Fe status was measured using serum ferritin (S-Ft), soluble transferrin receptor in serum (sTfR), and the ratio sTfR/S-Ft. The trace elements we investigated were, in blood, cadmium, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, mercury, and lead, and, in serum, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten,... (More)
Food is the main source of trace elements for the general Population. The gastrointestinal absorption of certain trace elements, e.g., cadmium, is strongly influenced by iron (Fe) status. This factor may also be relevant for the bioavailability of other trace elements. Therefore, we investigated relationships between Fe status indicators and trace element concentrations in blood and serum of 234 boys and girls at ages 15 and 17 years. Fe status was measured using serum ferritin (S-Ft), soluble transferrin receptor in serum (sTfR), and the ratio sTfR/S-Ft. The trace elements we investigated were, in blood, cadmium, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, mercury, and lead, and, in serum, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten, mercury, and lead. We found inverse correlations between Fe status and blood cadmium, blood or serum cobalt, or blood copper. There were positive correlations between Fe status and mercury concentrations. selenium was positively correlated with sTfR. The relationships between Fe status and lead were equivocal. There were fewer correlations for serum than for blood, but the inverse relationships between Fe status and cobalt were equally strong in serum and blood. We found only occasional, and perhaps spurious, correlations with zinc, rubidium, and tungsten. In conclusion, previous indications that cadmium, cobalt, and copper are absorbed by transport mechanisms similar to that of Fe are supported by this study. Strong positive correlations between Fe status and mercury concentrations remain to be explained. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
iron status, adolescence, blood, serum, trace elements
in
Environmental Research
volume
98
issue
2
pages
215 - 223
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:15820728
  • wos:000228623600009
  • scopus:17044399759
ISSN
1096-0953
DOI
10.1016/j.envres.2004.09.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f6947381-39a1-4ba9-b2cf-c8f5e95323ee (old id 244476)
date added to LUP
2007-08-15 08:49:29
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:32:29
@article{f6947381-39a1-4ba9-b2cf-c8f5e95323ee,
  abstract     = {Food is the main source of trace elements for the general Population. The gastrointestinal absorption of certain trace elements, e.g., cadmium, is strongly influenced by iron (Fe) status. This factor may also be relevant for the bioavailability of other trace elements. Therefore, we investigated relationships between Fe status indicators and trace element concentrations in blood and serum of 234 boys and girls at ages 15 and 17 years. Fe status was measured using serum ferritin (S-Ft), soluble transferrin receptor in serum (sTfR), and the ratio sTfR/S-Ft. The trace elements we investigated were, in blood, cadmium, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, mercury, and lead, and, in serum, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten, mercury, and lead. We found inverse correlations between Fe status and blood cadmium, blood or serum cobalt, or blood copper. There were positive correlations between Fe status and mercury concentrations. selenium was positively correlated with sTfR. The relationships between Fe status and lead were equivocal. There were fewer correlations for serum than for blood, but the inverse relationships between Fe status and cobalt were equally strong in serum and blood. We found only occasional, and perhaps spurious, correlations with zinc, rubidium, and tungsten. In conclusion, previous indications that cadmium, cobalt, and copper are absorbed by transport mechanisms similar to that of Fe are supported by this study. Strong positive correlations between Fe status and mercury concentrations remain to be explained.},
  author       = {Barany, E and Bergdahl, IA and Bratteby, LE and Lundh, Thomas and Samuelson, G and Skerfving, Staffan and Oskarsson, A},
  issn         = {1096-0953},
  keyword      = {iron status,adolescence,blood,serum,trace elements},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {215--223},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Environmental Research},
  title        = {Iron status influences trace element levels in human},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2004.09.010},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2005},
}