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Intensity interferometry : Optical imaging with kilometer baselines

Dravins, Dainis LU (2016) Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V In Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V 9907.
Abstract

Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from... (More)

Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cherenkov telescopes, Intensity interferometry, Long baselines, Optical imaging, Stars, Stellar surfaces
in
Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V
volume
9907
publisher
SPIE
conference name
Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V
external identifiers
  • scopus:85006862899
ISBN
9781510601932
DOI
10.1117/12.2234130
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
245c805b-4057-4411-bd6f-5aa0b14bff68
date added to LUP
2017-04-21 11:46:42
date last changed
2017-11-20 15:06:13
@inproceedings{245c805b-4057-4411-bd6f-5aa0b14bff68,
  abstract     = {<p>Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.</p>},
  author       = {Dravins, Dainis},
  booktitle    = {Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V},
  isbn         = {9781510601932},
  keyword      = {Cherenkov telescopes,Intensity interferometry,Long baselines,Optical imaging,Stars,Stellar surfaces},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {SPIE},
  title        = {Intensity interferometry : Optical imaging with kilometer baselines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2234130},
  volume       = {9907},
  year         = {2016},
}