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Influence of self-registration on audit participants and their non-participating colleagues - A retrospective study of medical records concerning prescription patterns

Strandberg, Eva-Lena LU ; Ovhed, I; Troein, Margareta LU and Håkansson, Anders LU (2005) In Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 23(1). p.42-46
Abstract
Objective. To compare participants and non-participants early in the process of an audit on treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and to analyse any effect of the actual self-registration on the prescription of antibiotics in both groups. Design. All 80 general practitioners (GPs) at 14 health centres were invited to audit their use of antibiotics and 45 agreed to participate. There were both participants and non-participants at all centres. Data were collected retrospectively from the electronic patient records of all visits for RTI during five periods including the self-registration period. Comparisons were made over time within and between the groups. Setting. Primary health care in Blekinge county, Southern Sweden. Subjects.... (More)
Objective. To compare participants and non-participants early in the process of an audit on treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and to analyse any effect of the actual self-registration on the prescription of antibiotics in both groups. Design. All 80 general practitioners (GPs) at 14 health centres were invited to audit their use of antibiotics and 45 agreed to participate. There were both participants and non-participants at all centres. Data were collected retrospectively from the electronic patient records of all visits for RTI during five periods including the self-registration period. Comparisons were made over time within and between the groups. Setting. Primary health care in Blekinge county, Southern Sweden. Subjects. 80 GPs: 45 participants and 35 non-participants. Main outcome measure. Proportion of patients with RTI who received antibiotics. Results. At the start, the difference in prescription frequency between participants and non-participants was six percentage points (RR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.87 - 0.97), and at the end seven percentage points (0.88; 0.81 - 0.95). The proportion of RTIs treated with antibiotics fell for both groups, ( 0.86; 0.80 - 0.92 and 0.90; 0.83 - 0.97, respectively). Conclusions. GPs who chose to take part in the audit had a different prescription pattern from the non-participants right from the start. Both groups reduced their prescription of antibiotics during the study period. Either the registration had no effect on the participants or it had an effect on both the participants and the non-participants. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
quality development, assurance, quality, medical decision-making, Hawthorne effects, medical audit
in
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
volume
23
issue
1
pages
42 - 46
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000227560000008
  • pmid:16025873
  • scopus:22244444203
ISSN
0281-3432
DOI
10.1080/02813430510018400
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
131df366-55e2-49d3-b60b-eb5dcbde4dc4 (old id 249107)
date added to LUP
2007-08-15 15:53:23
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:38:34
@article{131df366-55e2-49d3-b60b-eb5dcbde4dc4,
  abstract     = {Objective. To compare participants and non-participants early in the process of an audit on treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and to analyse any effect of the actual self-registration on the prescription of antibiotics in both groups. Design. All 80 general practitioners (GPs) at 14 health centres were invited to audit their use of antibiotics and 45 agreed to participate. There were both participants and non-participants at all centres. Data were collected retrospectively from the electronic patient records of all visits for RTI during five periods including the self-registration period. Comparisons were made over time within and between the groups. Setting. Primary health care in Blekinge county, Southern Sweden. Subjects. 80 GPs: 45 participants and 35 non-participants. Main outcome measure. Proportion of patients with RTI who received antibiotics. Results. At the start, the difference in prescription frequency between participants and non-participants was six percentage points (RR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.87 - 0.97), and at the end seven percentage points (0.88; 0.81 - 0.95). The proportion of RTIs treated with antibiotics fell for both groups, ( 0.86; 0.80 - 0.92 and 0.90; 0.83 - 0.97, respectively). Conclusions. GPs who chose to take part in the audit had a different prescription pattern from the non-participants right from the start. Both groups reduced their prescription of antibiotics during the study period. Either the registration had no effect on the participants or it had an effect on both the participants and the non-participants.},
  author       = {Strandberg, Eva-Lena and Ovhed, I and Troein, Margareta and Håkansson, Anders},
  issn         = {0281-3432},
  keyword      = {quality development,assurance,quality,medical decision-making,Hawthorne effects,medical audit},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {42--46},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care},
  title        = {Influence of self-registration on audit participants and their non-participating colleagues - A retrospective study of medical records concerning prescription patterns},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02813430510018400},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2005},
}