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Simulating space heating demand with respect to non-constant heat gains from household electricity

Johansson, Dennis LU and Bagge, Hans LU (2011) In Journal of Building Performance Simulation, Taylor & Francis 4(3). p.227-238
Abstract
It is crucial to perform energy simulations during the building process to design a building that meets requirements regarding low energy use. In a low energy building, internal heat gains such as excess heat from household electricity are a large part of the heat balance of the building. The internal heat gains depend on the occupants and are not constant, although they are often assumed constant in simulations of space heating demand. This article analyses how different usage patterns of household electricity affects simulated space heating demand. Parametric studies of energy use-related parameters were done to study the influence from different designs. The results show that the different energy use patterns affect the space heating... (More)
It is crucial to perform energy simulations during the building process to design a building that meets requirements regarding low energy use. In a low energy building, internal heat gains such as excess heat from household electricity are a large part of the heat balance of the building. The internal heat gains depend on the occupants and are not constant, although they are often assumed constant in simulations of space heating demand. This article analyses how different usage patterns of household electricity affects simulated space heating demand. Parametric studies of energy use-related parameters were done to study the influence from different designs. The results show that the different energy use patterns affect the space heating demand, especially in low energy buildings and during the colder parts of the year. To make accurate energy simulations of low energy buildings, household electricity use patterns should be taken into account. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
energy use, energy simulation, low energy building, internal heat gain, household electricity
in
Journal of Building Performance Simulation, Taylor & Francis
volume
4
issue
3
pages
227 - 238
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000299343700003
  • scopus:79955651060
ISSN
1940-1507
DOI
10.1080/19401493.2010.528030
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
24f350a3-c3d8-4426-9bc7-d771d832f195 (old id 2494117)
date added to LUP
2012-05-11 14:10:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:02:43
@article{24f350a3-c3d8-4426-9bc7-d771d832f195,
  abstract     = {It is crucial to perform energy simulations during the building process to design a building that meets requirements regarding low energy use. In a low energy building, internal heat gains such as excess heat from household electricity are a large part of the heat balance of the building. The internal heat gains depend on the occupants and are not constant, although they are often assumed constant in simulations of space heating demand. This article analyses how different usage patterns of household electricity affects simulated space heating demand. Parametric studies of energy use-related parameters were done to study the influence from different designs. The results show that the different energy use patterns affect the space heating demand, especially in low energy buildings and during the colder parts of the year. To make accurate energy simulations of low energy buildings, household electricity use patterns should be taken into account.},
  author       = {Johansson, Dennis and Bagge, Hans},
  issn         = {1940-1507},
  keyword      = {energy use,energy simulation,low energy building,internal heat gain,household electricity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {227--238},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Building Performance Simulation, Taylor & Francis},
  title        = {Simulating space heating demand with respect to non-constant heat gains from household electricity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19401493.2010.528030},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2011},
}