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Motor skills and school performance in children with daily physical education in school - a 9-year intervention study.

Ericsson, I and Karlsson, Magnus LU (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 24(2). p.273-278
Abstract
The aim was to study long-term effects on motor skills and school performance of increased physical education (PE). All pupils born 1990-1992 from one school were included in a longitudinal study over nine years. An intervention group (n = 129) achieved daily PE (5 × 45 min/week) and if needed one extra lesson of adapted motor training. The control group (n = 91) had PE two lessons/week. Motor skills were evaluated by the Motor Skills Development as Ground for Learning observation checklist and school achievements by marks in Swedish, English, Mathematics, and PE and proportion of pupils who qualified for upper secondary school. In school year 9 there were motor skills deficits in 7% of pupils in the intervention group compared to 47% in... (More)
The aim was to study long-term effects on motor skills and school performance of increased physical education (PE). All pupils born 1990-1992 from one school were included in a longitudinal study over nine years. An intervention group (n = 129) achieved daily PE (5 × 45 min/week) and if needed one extra lesson of adapted motor training. The control group (n = 91) had PE two lessons/week. Motor skills were evaluated by the Motor Skills Development as Ground for Learning observation checklist and school achievements by marks in Swedish, English, Mathematics, and PE and proportion of pupils who qualified for upper secondary school. In school year 9 there were motor skills deficits in 7% of pupils in the intervention group compared to 47% in the control group (P < 0.001), 96% of the pupils in the intervention group compared to 89% in the control group (P < 0.05) qualified for upper secondary school. The sum of evaluated marks was higher among boys in the intervention group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The sum of marks was also higher in pupils with no motor skills deficit than among pupils with motor skills deficits (P < 0.01), as was the proportion of pupils who qualified for upper secondary school (97% vs 81%, P < 0.001). Daily PE and adapted motor skills training during the compulsory school years is a feasible way to improve not only motor skills but also school performance and the proportion of pupils who qualify for upper secondary school. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
volume
24
issue
2
pages
273 - 278
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:22487170
  • wos:000332982700008
  • scopus:84896391604
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01458.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e45ed347-b84f-4565-b13e-dfd26a56fff2 (old id 2519683)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22487170?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-12-17 12:09:30
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:12:39
@article{e45ed347-b84f-4565-b13e-dfd26a56fff2,
  abstract     = {The aim was to study long-term effects on motor skills and school performance of increased physical education (PE). All pupils born 1990-1992 from one school were included in a longitudinal study over nine years. An intervention group (n = 129) achieved daily PE (5 × 45 min/week) and if needed one extra lesson of adapted motor training. The control group (n = 91) had PE two lessons/week. Motor skills were evaluated by the Motor Skills Development as Ground for Learning observation checklist and school achievements by marks in Swedish, English, Mathematics, and PE and proportion of pupils who qualified for upper secondary school. In school year 9 there were motor skills deficits in 7% of pupils in the intervention group compared to 47% in the control group (P &lt; 0.001), 96% of the pupils in the intervention group compared to 89% in the control group (P &lt; 0.05) qualified for upper secondary school. The sum of evaluated marks was higher among boys in the intervention group than in the control group (P &lt; 0.05). The sum of marks was also higher in pupils with no motor skills deficit than among pupils with motor skills deficits (P &lt; 0.01), as was the proportion of pupils who qualified for upper secondary school (97% vs 81%, P &lt; 0.001). Daily PE and adapted motor skills training during the compulsory school years is a feasible way to improve not only motor skills but also school performance and the proportion of pupils who qualify for upper secondary school.},
  author       = {Ericsson, I and Karlsson, Magnus},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {273--278},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Motor skills and school performance in children with daily physical education in school - a 9-year intervention study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01458.x},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2014},
}