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Lip kinematics in long and short stop and fricative consonants

Löfqvist, Anders LU (2005) In Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 117(2). p.858-878
Abstract
This paper examines lip and jaw kinematics in the production of labial stop and fricative consonants where the duration of the oral closure/constriction is varied for linguistic purposes. The subjects were speakers of Japanese and Swedish, two languages that have a contrast between short and long consonants. Lip and jaw movements were recorded using a magnetometer system. Based on earlier work showing that the lips are moving at a high velocity at the oral closure, it was hypothesized that speakers could control closure/constriction duration by varying the position of a virtual target for the lips. According to this hypothesis, the peak vertical position of the lower lip during the oral closure/constriction should be higher for the long... (More)
This paper examines lip and jaw kinematics in the production of labial stop and fricative consonants where the duration of the oral closure/constriction is varied for linguistic purposes. The subjects were speakers of Japanese and Swedish, two languages that have a contrast between short and long consonants. Lip and jaw movements were recorded using a magnetometer system. Based on earlier work showing that the lips are moving at a high velocity at the oral closure, it was hypothesized that speakers could control closure/constriction duration by varying the position of a virtual target for the lips. According to this hypothesis, the peak vertical position of the lower lip during the oral closure/constriction should be higher for the long than for the short consonants. This would result in the lips staying in contact for a longer period. The results show that this is the case for the Japanese subjects and one Swedish subject who produced non-overlapping distributions of closure/ constriction duration for the two categories. However, the peak velocity of the lower lip raising movement did not differ between the two categories. Thus if the lip movements in speech are controlled by specifying a virtual target, that control must involve variations in both the position and the timing of the target. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
volume
117
issue
2
pages
858 - 878
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • wos:000226986900039
  • pmid:15759706
  • scopus:13644251520
ISSN
1520-8524
DOI
10.1121/1.1840531
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b44f490-0644-4b4c-b7d7-24a83828f3d3 (old id 253547)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15759706
http://asadl.org/jasa/resource/1/jasman/v117/i2/p858_s1
date added to LUP
2007-08-16 14:37:18
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:34:40
@article{8b44f490-0644-4b4c-b7d7-24a83828f3d3,
  abstract     = {This paper examines lip and jaw kinematics in the production of labial stop and fricative consonants where the duration of the oral closure/constriction is varied for linguistic purposes. The subjects were speakers of Japanese and Swedish, two languages that have a contrast between short and long consonants. Lip and jaw movements were recorded using a magnetometer system. Based on earlier work showing that the lips are moving at a high velocity at the oral closure, it was hypothesized that speakers could control closure/constriction duration by varying the position of a virtual target for the lips. According to this hypothesis, the peak vertical position of the lower lip during the oral closure/constriction should be higher for the long than for the short consonants. This would result in the lips staying in contact for a longer period. The results show that this is the case for the Japanese subjects and one Swedish subject who produced non-overlapping distributions of closure/ constriction duration for the two categories. However, the peak velocity of the lower lip raising movement did not differ between the two categories. Thus if the lip movements in speech are controlled by specifying a virtual target, that control must involve variations in both the position and the timing of the target.},
  author       = {Löfqvist, Anders},
  issn         = {1520-8524},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {858--878},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  title        = {Lip kinematics in long and short stop and fricative consonants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.1840531},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2005},
}