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High-temperature and high-concentration SCR of NO with NH3: Application in a CCS process for removal of carbon dioxide

Brandin, Jan LU ; Hulteberg, Christian LU and Odenbrand, Ingemar LU (2012) In Chemical Engineering Journal 191. p.218-227
Abstract
This study investigates several commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (A–E) for application in a high-temperature (approximately 525 °C) and high-concentration (5000 ppm NO) system in combination with CO2 capture. The suggested process for removing high concentrations of NOx seems plausible and autothermal operation is possible for very high NO concentrations. A key property of the catalyst in this system is its thermal stability. This was tested and modelled with the general power law model using second-order decay of the BET surface area with time. Most of the materials did not have very high thermal stability. The zeolite-based materials could likely be used, but they too need improved stability. The SCR activity and... (More)
This study investigates several commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (A–E) for application in a high-temperature (approximately 525 °C) and high-concentration (5000 ppm NO) system in combination with CO2 capture. The suggested process for removing high concentrations of NOx seems plausible and autothermal operation is possible for very high NO concentrations. A key property of the catalyst in this system is its thermal stability. This was tested and modelled with the general power law model using second-order decay of the BET surface area with time. Most of the materials did not have very high thermal stability. The zeolite-based materials could likely be used, but they too need improved stability. The SCR activity and the possible formation of the by-product N2O were determined by measurement in a fixed-bed reactor at 300–525 °C. All materials displayed sufficiently high activity for a designed 96% conversion in the twin-bed SCR reactor system proposed. The amount of catalyst needed varied considerably and was much higher for the zeolithic materials. The formation of N2O increased with temperature for almost all materials except the zeolithic ones. The selectivity to N2 production at 525 °C was 98.6% for the best material and 95.7% for the worst with 1000 ppm NOx in the inlet; at 5000 ppm NOx, the values were much better, i.e., 98.3 and 99.9%, respectively. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
High-temperature SCR, High-concentration SCR, Thermal stability, Commercial catalysts
in
Chemical Engineering Journal
volume
191
pages
218 - 227
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000304793300026
  • scopus:84860556940
ISSN
1385-8947
DOI
10.1016/j.cej.2012.03.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6b19e0bf-ae2c-4eb3-a23f-89b414af3a87 (old id 2540587)
alternative location
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S138589471200349X
date added to LUP
2012-05-16 12:34:27
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:19:34
@article{6b19e0bf-ae2c-4eb3-a23f-89b414af3a87,
  abstract     = {This study investigates several commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts (A–E) for application in a high-temperature (approximately 525 °C) and high-concentration (5000 ppm NO) system in combination with CO2 capture. The suggested process for removing high concentrations of NOx seems plausible and autothermal operation is possible for very high NO concentrations. A key property of the catalyst in this system is its thermal stability. This was tested and modelled with the general power law model using second-order decay of the BET surface area with time. Most of the materials did not have very high thermal stability. The zeolite-based materials could likely be used, but they too need improved stability. The SCR activity and the possible formation of the by-product N2O were determined by measurement in a fixed-bed reactor at 300–525 °C. All materials displayed sufficiently high activity for a designed 96% conversion in the twin-bed SCR reactor system proposed. The amount of catalyst needed varied considerably and was much higher for the zeolithic materials. The formation of N2O increased with temperature for almost all materials except the zeolithic ones. The selectivity to N2 production at 525 °C was 98.6% for the best material and 95.7% for the worst with 1000 ppm NOx in the inlet; at 5000 ppm NOx, the values were much better, i.e., 98.3 and 99.9%, respectively.},
  author       = {Brandin, Jan and Hulteberg, Christian and Odenbrand, Ingemar},
  issn         = {1385-8947},
  keyword      = {High-temperature SCR,High-concentration SCR,Thermal stability,Commercial catalysts},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {218--227},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemical Engineering Journal},
  title        = {High-temperature and high-concentration SCR of NO with NH3: Application in a CCS process for removal of carbon dioxide},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2012.03.006},
  volume       = {191},
  year         = {2012},
}