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The dynamics of platelet activation during the progression of streptococcal sepsis

Hurley, Sinead M. LU ; Lutay, Nataliya; Holmqvist, Bo and Shannon, Oonagh LU (2016) In PLoS ONE 11(9).
Abstract

Platelets contribute to inflammation however, the role of platelet activation during the pathophysiological response to invasive bacterial infection and sepsis is not clear. Herein, we have investigated platelet activation in a mouse model of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection at 5,12, and 18 hours post infection and correlated this to parameters of infection. The platelet population in ex-vivo blood samples showed no increased integrin activation or surface presentation of CD62P, however platelet-neutrophil complex formation and plasma levels of CD62P were increased during bacterial dissemination and the progression of sepsis, indicating that platelet activation had occurred in vivo. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation was the... (More)

Platelets contribute to inflammation however, the role of platelet activation during the pathophysiological response to invasive bacterial infection and sepsis is not clear. Herein, we have investigated platelet activation in a mouse model of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection at 5,12, and 18 hours post infection and correlated this to parameters of infection. The platelet population in ex-vivo blood samples showed no increased integrin activation or surface presentation of CD62P, however platelet-neutrophil complex formation and plasma levels of CD62P were increased during bacterial dissemination and the progression of sepsis, indicating that platelet activation had occurred in vivo. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation was the most discriminatory marker of platelet activation. Platelet-neutrophil complexes were increased above baseline levels during early sepsis but decreased to significantly lower levels than baseline during late sepsis. The removal of these complexes from the circulation coincided with a significant increase in organ damage and the accumulation of platelets in the liver sinusoids, suggesting that platelet activation in the circulation precedes accumulation of platelets in damaged organs. The results demonstrate that monitoring platelet activation using complementary methods may provide prognostic information during the pathogenesis of invasive S. pyogenes infection.

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published
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in
PLoS ONE
volume
11
issue
9
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:84992175090
  • wos:000383893200139
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0163531
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2541b9b6-e3ba-471f-b2d7-643860c24870
date added to LUP
2016-11-04 09:16:13
date last changed
2017-11-05 05:08:59
@article{2541b9b6-e3ba-471f-b2d7-643860c24870,
  abstract     = {<p>Platelets contribute to inflammation however, the role of platelet activation during the pathophysiological response to invasive bacterial infection and sepsis is not clear. Herein, we have investigated platelet activation in a mouse model of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection at 5,12, and 18 hours post infection and correlated this to parameters of infection. The platelet population in ex-vivo blood samples showed no increased integrin activation or surface presentation of CD62P, however platelet-neutrophil complex formation and plasma levels of CD62P were increased during bacterial dissemination and the progression of sepsis, indicating that platelet activation had occurred in vivo. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation was the most discriminatory marker of platelet activation. Platelet-neutrophil complexes were increased above baseline levels during early sepsis but decreased to significantly lower levels than baseline during late sepsis. The removal of these complexes from the circulation coincided with a significant increase in organ damage and the accumulation of platelets in the liver sinusoids, suggesting that platelet activation in the circulation precedes accumulation of platelets in damaged organs. The results demonstrate that monitoring platelet activation using complementary methods may provide prognostic information during the pathogenesis of invasive S. pyogenes infection.</p>},
  articleno    = {e0163531},
  author       = {Hurley, Sinead M. and Lutay, Nataliya and Holmqvist, Bo and Shannon, Oonagh},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {9},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {The dynamics of platelet activation during the progression of streptococcal sepsis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0163531},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}