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Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century

Cordain, L; Eaton, SB; Sebastian, A; Mann, N; Lindeberg, Staffan LU ; Watkins, BA; O'Keefe, JH and Brand-Miller, J (2005) In American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 81(2). p.341-354
Abstract
There is growing awareness that the profound changes in the environment (eg, in diet and other lifestyle conditions) that began with the introduction of agriculture and animal husbandry approximate to10 000 y ago occurred too recently on an evolutionary time scale for the human genome to adjust. In conjunction with this discordance between our ancient, genetically determined biology and the nutritional, cultural, and activity patterns of contemporary Western populations, many of the so-called diseases of civilization have emerged. In particular, food staples and food-processing procedures introduced during the Neolithic and Industrial Periods have fundamentally altered 7 crucial nutritional characteristics of ancestral hominin diets: 1)... (More)
There is growing awareness that the profound changes in the environment (eg, in diet and other lifestyle conditions) that began with the introduction of agriculture and animal husbandry approximate to10 000 y ago occurred too recently on an evolutionary time scale for the human genome to adjust. In conjunction with this discordance between our ancient, genetically determined biology and the nutritional, cultural, and activity patterns of contemporary Western populations, many of the so-called diseases of civilization have emerged. In particular, food staples and food-processing procedures introduced during the Neolithic and Industrial Periods have fundamentally altered 7 crucial nutritional characteristics of ancestral hominin diets: 1) glycemic load, 2) fatty acid composition, 3) macronutrient composition, 4) micronutrient density, 5) acid-base balance, 6) sodium-potassium ratio, and 7) fiber content. The evolutionary collision of our ancient genome with the nutritional qualities of recently introduced foods may underlie many of the chronic diseases of Western civilization. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hunter-gatherers, genetic, processed foods, chronic disease, westernized diets, discordance, human evolution
in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
volume
81
issue
2
pages
341 - 354
publisher
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
external identifiers
  • wos:000226943100003
  • scopus:14544275997
ISSN
1938-3207
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ddbcd27d-b88a-4419-85a3-375b1c8e85b1 (old id 254677)
alternative location
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/81/2/341
date added to LUP
2007-08-20 16:07:35
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:55:02
@misc{ddbcd27d-b88a-4419-85a3-375b1c8e85b1,
  abstract     = {There is growing awareness that the profound changes in the environment (eg, in diet and other lifestyle conditions) that began with the introduction of agriculture and animal husbandry approximate to10 000 y ago occurred too recently on an evolutionary time scale for the human genome to adjust. In conjunction with this discordance between our ancient, genetically determined biology and the nutritional, cultural, and activity patterns of contemporary Western populations, many of the so-called diseases of civilization have emerged. In particular, food staples and food-processing procedures introduced during the Neolithic and Industrial Periods have fundamentally altered 7 crucial nutritional characteristics of ancestral hominin diets: 1) glycemic load, 2) fatty acid composition, 3) macronutrient composition, 4) micronutrient density, 5) acid-base balance, 6) sodium-potassium ratio, and 7) fiber content. The evolutionary collision of our ancient genome with the nutritional qualities of recently introduced foods may underlie many of the chronic diseases of Western civilization.},
  author       = {Cordain, L and Eaton, SB and Sebastian, A and Mann, N and Lindeberg, Staffan and Watkins, BA and O'Keefe, JH and Brand-Miller, J},
  issn         = {1938-3207},
  keyword      = {hunter-gatherers,genetic,processed foods,chronic disease,westernized diets,discordance,human evolution},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {341--354},
  publisher    = {American Society for Clinical Nutrition},
  series       = {American Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2005},
}