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Effect of vertebral fractures on function, quality of life and hospitalisation the AGES-Reykjavik study

Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Aspelund, Thor; Jonsson, Brynjolfur LU ; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Launer, Lenore J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Sigurdsson, Gunnar and Gudnason, Vilmundur (2012) In Age and Ageing 41(3). p.351-357
Abstract
Objective: assess the effect of clinical vertebral and other osteoporotic fractures on function and the subsequent risk of hospitalisation. Design: individuals from the prospective population-based cohort study Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study were examined between 2002 and 2006 and followed up for 5.4 years. Subjects: a total of 5,764 individuals, 57.7% women, born 1907-35, mean age 77. Method: four groups with a verified fracture status were used; vertebral fractures, other osteoporotic fractures excluding vertebral, non-osteoporotic fractures and not-fractured were compared and analysed for the effect on mobility, strength, QoL, ADL, co-morbidity and hospitalisation. Results: worst performance on functional... (More)
Objective: assess the effect of clinical vertebral and other osteoporotic fractures on function and the subsequent risk of hospitalisation. Design: individuals from the prospective population-based cohort study Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study were examined between 2002 and 2006 and followed up for 5.4 years. Subjects: a total of 5,764 individuals, 57.7% women, born 1907-35, mean age 77. Method: four groups with a verified fracture status were used; vertebral fractures, other osteoporotic fractures excluding vertebral, non-osteoporotic fractures and not-fractured were compared and analysed for the effect on mobility, strength, QoL, ADL, co-morbidity and hospitalisation. Results: worst performance on functional tests was in the vertebral fracture group for women (P < 0.0001) and the other osteoporotic fractures group for men (P < 0.05). Both vertebral and other osteoporotic fractures, showed an increased risk of hospitalisation, HR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1-1.2) respectively (P < 0.0001). Individuals with vertebral fractures had 50% (P < 0.0001) longer hospitalisation than not-fractured and 33% (P < 0.002) longer than the other osteoporotic fractures group. Conclusion: individuals with a history of clinical vertebral fracture seem to carry the greatest health burden compared with other fracture groups, emphasising the attention which should be given to those individuals. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vertebral fracture, health burden, osteoporotic fracture, strength, ADL, quality of life, mobility, elderly
in
Age and Ageing
volume
41
issue
3
pages
351 - 357
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000303335000013
  • scopus:84860510776
ISSN
1468-2834
DOI
10.1093/ageing/afs003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d085e768-99b3-4ce6-822e-963985fcc02e (old id 2551539)
date added to LUP
2012-06-01 08:49:44
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:12:29
@article{d085e768-99b3-4ce6-822e-963985fcc02e,
  abstract     = {Objective: assess the effect of clinical vertebral and other osteoporotic fractures on function and the subsequent risk of hospitalisation. Design: individuals from the prospective population-based cohort study Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik study were examined between 2002 and 2006 and followed up for 5.4 years. Subjects: a total of 5,764 individuals, 57.7% women, born 1907-35, mean age 77. Method: four groups with a verified fracture status were used; vertebral fractures, other osteoporotic fractures excluding vertebral, non-osteoporotic fractures and not-fractured were compared and analysed for the effect on mobility, strength, QoL, ADL, co-morbidity and hospitalisation. Results: worst performance on functional tests was in the vertebral fracture group for women (P &lt; 0.0001) and the other osteoporotic fractures group for men (P &lt; 0.05). Both vertebral and other osteoporotic fractures, showed an increased risk of hospitalisation, HR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7) and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1-1.2) respectively (P &lt; 0.0001). Individuals with vertebral fractures had 50% (P &lt; 0.0001) longer hospitalisation than not-fractured and 33% (P &lt; 0.002) longer than the other osteoporotic fractures group. Conclusion: individuals with a history of clinical vertebral fracture seem to carry the greatest health burden compared with other fracture groups, emphasising the attention which should be given to those individuals.},
  author       = {Siggeirsdottir, Kristin and Aspelund, Thor and Jonsson, Brynjolfur and Mogensen, Brynjolfur and Launer, Lenore J. and Harris, Tamara B. and Sigurdsson, Gunnar and Gudnason, Vilmundur},
  issn         = {1468-2834},
  keyword      = {vertebral fracture,health burden,osteoporotic fracture,strength,ADL,quality of life,mobility,elderly},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {351--357},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Age and Ageing},
  title        = {Effect of vertebral fractures on function, quality of life and hospitalisation the AGES-Reykjavik study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afs003},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2012},
}