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Ultrastructural immunolocalisation of bone sialoprotein in the osteocartilagenous interface of the equine third carpal bone

Ekman, S; Skioebrand, E; Heinegård, Dick LU and Hultenby, K (2005) In Equine Veterinary Journal 37(1). p.26-30
Abstract
Reasons for performing study: One of the most common causes of lameness in racehorses is osteoarthritis (OA). Pathogenesis is not clear and pathological processes of the different joint tissues interact in often progressive events. The interface between cartilage and newly synthesised bone has been shown to be particularly enriched in bone sialoprotein (BSP), a cell-binding matrix protein. Objectives: To establish whether changes in the concentration of BSP may serve as a marker for early biochemical changes of the subchondral bone. Methods: Articular cartilage, cartilage/bone interface and subchondral bone of the proximal third carpal bone from 3 Standardbred trotters were analysed ultrastructurally for the presence of BSP in normal and... (More)
Reasons for performing study: One of the most common causes of lameness in racehorses is osteoarthritis (OA). Pathogenesis is not clear and pathological processes of the different joint tissues interact in often progressive events. The interface between cartilage and newly synthesised bone has been shown to be particularly enriched in bone sialoprotein (BSP), a cell-binding matrix protein. Objectives: To establish whether changes in the concentration of BSP may serve as a marker for early biochemical changes of the subchondral bone. Methods: Articular cartilage, cartilage/bone interface and subchondral bone of the proximal third carpal bone from 3 Standardbred trotters were analysed ultrastructurally for the presence of BSP in normal and degenerative areas. Results: A marked increase of BSP in the cartilage/bone interface with degenerative changes of the bone and cartilage compared to the morphologically intact cartilage/bone interface was noted, but levels of the protein were distinctly lower in the distal bone. Conclusions: The results indicate that BSP has the potential to be used as a marker for changes in bone metabolism in the subchondral one. Potential relevance: Tools to monitor early biochemical changes within the connective tissues of the joint in vivo are essential in studies of the pathogenesis of OA. These could be used to monitor and understand such changes in relation to load, exercise, training programmes, inflammation and the development of OA. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bone sialoprotein, osteoarthritis, horse, third carpal bone
in
Equine Veterinary Journal
volume
37
issue
1
pages
26 - 30
publisher
Equine Veterinary Journal Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:15651730
  • wos:000226126200006
  • scopus:11844275397
ISSN
0425-1644
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7bfb2b52-b6fd-4d11-8852-7774d5cd953b (old id 258024)
alternative location
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/evj/evj/2005/00000037/00000001/art00006
date added to LUP
2007-09-21 13:32:17
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:35:21
@article{7bfb2b52-b6fd-4d11-8852-7774d5cd953b,
  abstract     = {Reasons for performing study: One of the most common causes of lameness in racehorses is osteoarthritis (OA). Pathogenesis is not clear and pathological processes of the different joint tissues interact in often progressive events. The interface between cartilage and newly synthesised bone has been shown to be particularly enriched in bone sialoprotein (BSP), a cell-binding matrix protein. Objectives: To establish whether changes in the concentration of BSP may serve as a marker for early biochemical changes of the subchondral bone. Methods: Articular cartilage, cartilage/bone interface and subchondral bone of the proximal third carpal bone from 3 Standardbred trotters were analysed ultrastructurally for the presence of BSP in normal and degenerative areas. Results: A marked increase of BSP in the cartilage/bone interface with degenerative changes of the bone and cartilage compared to the morphologically intact cartilage/bone interface was noted, but levels of the protein were distinctly lower in the distal bone. Conclusions: The results indicate that BSP has the potential to be used as a marker for changes in bone metabolism in the subchondral one. Potential relevance: Tools to monitor early biochemical changes within the connective tissues of the joint in vivo are essential in studies of the pathogenesis of OA. These could be used to monitor and understand such changes in relation to load, exercise, training programmes, inflammation and the development of OA.},
  author       = {Ekman, S and Skioebrand, E and Heinegård, Dick and Hultenby, K},
  issn         = {0425-1644},
  keyword      = {bone sialoprotein,osteoarthritis,horse,third carpal bone},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {26--30},
  publisher    = {Equine Veterinary Journal Ltd},
  series       = {Equine Veterinary Journal},
  title        = {Ultrastructural immunolocalisation of bone sialoprotein in the osteocartilagenous interface of the equine third carpal bone},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2005},
}