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Reinstitutionalisation in mental-health care: comparison of data on service provision from six European countries

Priebe, S; Badesconyi, A; Fioritti, A; Hansson, Lars LU ; Kilian, RT; Torres-Gonzales, F; Turner, T and Wiersma, D (2005) In B M J: British Medical Journal1995-01-01+01:00 330(7483). p.123-126
Abstract
Objective To establish whether reinstitutionalisation is occurring in mental health care mid, if so, with What variations between Western European countries. Design Comparison of data on changes in service provision. Setting Six European countries with different traditions of mental health care that have all experienced deinstitutionalisation since the 1970s - England, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, mid Sweden. Outcome measures Changes in die number of forensic hospital beds, involuntary hospital admissions, places in supported housing, general psychiatric hospital beds, and general prison population between 1990-1 mid 2002-3. Results Forensic beds and places in supported housing have increased in all countries, whereas changes in... (More)
Objective To establish whether reinstitutionalisation is occurring in mental health care mid, if so, with What variations between Western European countries. Design Comparison of data on changes in service provision. Setting Six European countries with different traditions of mental health care that have all experienced deinstitutionalisation since the 1970s - England, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, mid Sweden. Outcome measures Changes in die number of forensic hospital beds, involuntary hospital admissions, places in supported housing, general psychiatric hospital beds, and general prison population between 1990-1 mid 2002-3. Results Forensic beds and places in supported housing have increased in all countries, whereas changes in it involuntary hospital admissions have been inconsistent. The number of psychiatric hospital beds h is been reduced in five countries, but only in two countries does this reduction outweigh the number of additional places in forensic institutions and supported housing The general prison population has substantially increased in all countries. Conclusions Reinstitutionalisation is taking place in European countries with different, traditions of health care, although with significant variation between the six countries studied. The precise reasons for the phenomenon remain unclear. General attitudes to risk containment in a society, as indicated by the size of the prison population, may be more Important than changing morbidity and new methods of mental healthcare delivery. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
B M J: British Medical Journal1995-01-01+01:00
volume
330
issue
7483
pages
123 - 126
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000226454900017
  • pmid:15567803
  • scopus:12344273616
ISSN
1756-1833
DOI
10.1136/bmj.38296.611215.AE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
516f6fd7-9586-4e3c-8247-6a520904dea1 (old id 258102)
date added to LUP
2007-08-23 17:51:35
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:19:54
@article{516f6fd7-9586-4e3c-8247-6a520904dea1,
  abstract     = {Objective To establish whether reinstitutionalisation is occurring in mental health care mid, if so, with What variations between Western European countries. Design Comparison of data on changes in service provision. Setting Six European countries with different traditions of mental health care that have all experienced deinstitutionalisation since the 1970s - England, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, mid Sweden. Outcome measures Changes in die number of forensic hospital beds, involuntary hospital admissions, places in supported housing, general psychiatric hospital beds, and general prison population between 1990-1 mid 2002-3. Results Forensic beds and places in supported housing have increased in all countries, whereas changes in it involuntary hospital admissions have been inconsistent. The number of psychiatric hospital beds h is been reduced in five countries, but only in two countries does this reduction outweigh the number of additional places in forensic institutions and supported housing The general prison population has substantially increased in all countries. Conclusions Reinstitutionalisation is taking place in European countries with different, traditions of health care, although with significant variation between the six countries studied. The precise reasons for the phenomenon remain unclear. General attitudes to risk containment in a society, as indicated by the size of the prison population, may be more Important than changing morbidity and new methods of mental healthcare delivery.},
  author       = {Priebe, S and Badesconyi, A and Fioritti, A and Hansson, Lars and Kilian, RT and Torres-Gonzales, F and Turner, T and Wiersma, D},
  issn         = {1756-1833},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7483},
  pages        = {123--126},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {B M J: British Medical Journal1995-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Reinstitutionalisation in mental-health care: comparison of data on service provision from six European countries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38296.611215.AE},
  volume       = {330},
  year         = {2005},
}