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Gestational Age at Birth and Risk of Gastric Acid-Related Disorders in Young Adulthood

Crump, Casey; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2012) In Annals of Epidemiology 22(4). p.233-238
Abstract
PURPOSE: Preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in infancy, but no investigators have examined this association beyond early childhood. We used antisecretory medication data to explore whether preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in young adulthood. METHODS: We conducted a national cohort study of 626,811 individuals born in Sweden in 1973 to 1979, followed up for antisecretory (proton pump inhibitor and H2-receptor antagonist) medication prescriptions from all outpatient and inpatient pharmacies nationwide from 2005 to 2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). We excluded individuals with congenital anomalies, and examined potential confounding by other comorbidities identified on the basis of oral... (More)
PURPOSE: Preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in infancy, but no investigators have examined this association beyond early childhood. We used antisecretory medication data to explore whether preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in young adulthood. METHODS: We conducted a national cohort study of 626,811 individuals born in Sweden in 1973 to 1979, followed up for antisecretory (proton pump inhibitor and H2-receptor antagonist) medication prescriptions from all outpatient and inpatient pharmacies nationwide from 2005 to 2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). We excluded individuals with congenital anomalies, and examined potential confounding by other comorbidities identified on the basis of oral anti-inflammatory or corticosteroid medication prescription. RESULTS: Gestational age at birth was inversely associated with antisecretory medication prescription in young adulthood. Adjusted odds ratios for >= 1 antisecretory medication prescription/year were 3.38 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.73-6.62) for individuals born at 22-27 weeks, 1.38 (95% CI, 1.19-1.60) for those born at 28-34 weeks, and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.32) for those born at 35-36 weeks, relative to those born full-term (37-42 weeks). Exclusion of individuals who were prescribed oral anti-inflammatory or corticosteroid medications (>= 1/year) had little effect on these results. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low gestational age at birth may be independently associated with an increased risk of gastric acid-related disorders in young adulthood. Ann Epidemiol 2012;22:233-238. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Gastric Acid, Gastroesophageal Reflux, Gestational Age, Premature Birth
in
Annals of Epidemiology
volume
22
issue
4
pages
233 - 238
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000302510100002
  • scopus:84859008344
ISSN
1047-2797
DOI
10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.02.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
98f2f4cd-3a4a-4fc1-8454-f0f405a75d78 (old id 2587563)
date added to LUP
2012-06-01 09:36:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:00:21
@article{98f2f4cd-3a4a-4fc1-8454-f0f405a75d78,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: Preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in infancy, but no investigators have examined this association beyond early childhood. We used antisecretory medication data to explore whether preterm birth is associated with gastric acid-related disorders in young adulthood. METHODS: We conducted a national cohort study of 626,811 individuals born in Sweden in 1973 to 1979, followed up for antisecretory (proton pump inhibitor and H2-receptor antagonist) medication prescriptions from all outpatient and inpatient pharmacies nationwide from 2005 to 2009 (ages 25.5-37.0 years). We excluded individuals with congenital anomalies, and examined potential confounding by other comorbidities identified on the basis of oral anti-inflammatory or corticosteroid medication prescription. RESULTS: Gestational age at birth was inversely associated with antisecretory medication prescription in young adulthood. Adjusted odds ratios for >= 1 antisecretory medication prescription/year were 3.38 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.73-6.62) for individuals born at 22-27 weeks, 1.38 (95% CI, 1.19-1.60) for those born at 28-34 weeks, and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.32) for those born at 35-36 weeks, relative to those born full-term (37-42 weeks). Exclusion of individuals who were prescribed oral anti-inflammatory or corticosteroid medications (>= 1/year) had little effect on these results. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low gestational age at birth may be independently associated with an increased risk of gastric acid-related disorders in young adulthood. Ann Epidemiol 2012;22:233-238. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Crump, Casey and Winkleby, Marilyn A. and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1047-2797},
  keyword      = {Gastric Acid,Gastroesophageal Reflux,Gestational Age,Premature Birth},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {233--238},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Annals of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Gestational Age at Birth and Risk of Gastric Acid-Related Disorders in Young Adulthood},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2012.02.006},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2012},
}