Advanced

Expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2) in ileum and other extraprostatic tissues

Ceder, Yvonne LU ; Bjartell, Anders LU ; Lilja, Hans LU and Lundwall, Åke LU (2005) In International Journal of Cancer 113(2). p.290-297
Abstract
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker for prostate cancer. In the literature, there are reports of nonprostatic expression of PSA that potentially can affect early diagnosis. However, the results are scattered and inconclusive, which motivated us to conduct a more comprehensive study of the tissue distribution of PSA and the closely related protein human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of both PSA and hK2 in secretory epithelial cells of trachea, thyroid gland, mammary gland, salivary gland, jejunum, ileum, epididymis, seminal vesicle and urethra, as well as in Leydig cells, pancreatic exocrine glands and epidermis. Immunometric... (More)
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker for prostate cancer. In the literature, there are reports of nonprostatic expression of PSA that potentially can affect early diagnosis. However, the results are scattered and inconclusive, which motivated us to conduct a more comprehensive study of the tissue distribution of PSA and the closely related protein human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of both PSA and hK2 in secretory epithelial cells of trachea, thyroid gland, mammary gland, salivary gland, jejunum, ileum, epididymis, seminal vesicle and urethra, as well as in Leydig cells, pancreatic exocrine glands and epidermis. Immunometric measurements revealed that the concentration of PSA in nonprostatic tissues represents less than 1% of the amount in normal prostate. Pronounced expression of PSA was detected in the Paneth cells in ileum, which prompted us to compare functional parameters of PSA in ileum and prostate. We found that in homogenates from these 2 tissues, PSA manifested equivalent amidolytic activity and capacity to form complexes with protease inhibitors in blood in vitro. Thus, PSA released from sources other than the prostate may add to the plasma pool of this protein, but given the lower levels detected from those sites, it is unlikely that nonprostatic PSA normally can interfere with the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, this risk should not be neglected as it may be of clinical significance under certain circumstances. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the International Journal of Cancer website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0020-7136/ suppmat/index.htmi. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hybridization, in situ, tissue distribution, kallikreins, prostate-specific antigen, immunohistochemistry
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
113
issue
2
pages
290 - 297
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:15389512
  • wos:000225717500015
  • scopus:10344247660
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.20605
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c21c5ba9-3dc8-4224-98ed-3d11f166b961 (old id 259239)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15389512&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-08-10 16:03:31
date last changed
2017-09-17 04:55:10
@article{c21c5ba9-3dc8-4224-98ed-3d11f166b961,
  abstract     = {Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker for prostate cancer. In the literature, there are reports of nonprostatic expression of PSA that potentially can affect early diagnosis. However, the results are scattered and inconclusive, which motivated us to conduct a more comprehensive study of the tissue distribution of PSA and the closely related protein human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of both PSA and hK2 in secretory epithelial cells of trachea, thyroid gland, mammary gland, salivary gland, jejunum, ileum, epididymis, seminal vesicle and urethra, as well as in Leydig cells, pancreatic exocrine glands and epidermis. Immunometric measurements revealed that the concentration of PSA in nonprostatic tissues represents less than 1% of the amount in normal prostate. Pronounced expression of PSA was detected in the Paneth cells in ileum, which prompted us to compare functional parameters of PSA in ileum and prostate. We found that in homogenates from these 2 tissues, PSA manifested equivalent amidolytic activity and capacity to form complexes with protease inhibitors in blood in vitro. Thus, PSA released from sources other than the prostate may add to the plasma pool of this protein, but given the lower levels detected from those sites, it is unlikely that nonprostatic PSA normally can interfere with the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, this risk should not be neglected as it may be of clinical significance under certain circumstances. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the International Journal of Cancer website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0020-7136/ suppmat/index.htmi.},
  author       = {Ceder, Yvonne and Bjartell, Anders and Lilja, Hans and Lundwall, Åke},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  keyword      = {hybridization,in situ,tissue distribution,kallikreins,prostate-specific antigen,immunohistochemistry},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {290--297},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2) in ileum and other extraprostatic tissues},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.20605},
  volume       = {113},
  year         = {2005},
}