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Establishing aluminium contact allergy.

Siemund, Ingrid LU ; Zimerson, Erik LU ; Hindsén, Monica LU and Bruze, Magnus LU (2012) In Contact Dermatitis 67(3). p.162-170
Abstract
Background:

Traditionally, contact allergy to aluminium has been established by patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 2.0% and an empty Finn Chamber®.



Objectives:

The aim of this study was to investigate different aluminium test preparations regarding an optimal compound and an optimal test concentration. Methods. Six different aluminium compounds and an empty Finn Chamber® were used to patch test 21 patients with aluminium contact allergy. Aluminium chloride hexahydrate in saline was used for intracutaneous injection of 19 patients.



Results:

One test preparation, aluminium lactate 2.4%, was found to show significantly more positive patch test... (More)
Background:

Traditionally, contact allergy to aluminium has been established by patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 2.0% and an empty Finn Chamber®.



Objectives:

The aim of this study was to investigate different aluminium test preparations regarding an optimal compound and an optimal test concentration. Methods. Six different aluminium compounds and an empty Finn Chamber® were used to patch test 21 patients with aluminium contact allergy. Aluminium chloride hexahydrate in saline was used for intracutaneous injection of 19 patients.



Results:

One test preparation, aluminium lactate 2.4%, was found to show significantly more positive patch test reactions than aluminium chloride hexahydrate 2.0% (p = 0.03). Aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10.0% pet. gave the highest number of positive reactions to aluminium [14/21 (67%)]. No positive reactions were noted to an empty Finn Chamber®, and 3 of 19 (16%) patients reacted positively to the intradermal test.



Conclusions:

The results of this study indicate that patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate 2.0%, with an empty Finn Chamber® and the intradermal test with the salt and doses used are insufficient methods to detect contact allergy to aluminium. Aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10.0% gave the highest number of positive reactions to aluminium. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
67
issue
3
pages
162 - 170
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000307846500007
  • pmid:22594839
  • scopus:84865240313
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02084.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8d09e4d-f5b0-49e4-b2dc-47ec0e7ca083 (old id 2608770)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22594839?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-06-03 19:09:29
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:41:57
@article{e8d09e4d-f5b0-49e4-b2dc-47ec0e7ca083,
  abstract     = {Background:<br/><br>
Traditionally, contact allergy to aluminium has been established by patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum at 2.0% and an empty Finn Chamber®. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objectives:<br/><br>
The aim of this study was to investigate different aluminium test preparations regarding an optimal compound and an optimal test concentration. Methods. Six different aluminium compounds and an empty Finn Chamber® were used to patch test 21 patients with aluminium contact allergy. Aluminium chloride hexahydrate in saline was used for intracutaneous injection of 19 patients. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results:<br/><br>
One test preparation, aluminium lactate 2.4%, was found to show significantly more positive patch test reactions than aluminium chloride hexahydrate 2.0% (p = 0.03). Aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10.0% pet. gave the highest number of positive reactions to aluminium [14/21 (67%)]. No positive reactions were noted to an empty Finn Chamber®, and 3 of 19 (16%) patients reacted positively to the intradermal test. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions:<br/><br>
The results of this study indicate that patch testing with aluminium chloride hexahydrate 2.0%, with an empty Finn Chamber® and the intradermal test with the salt and doses used are insufficient methods to detect contact allergy to aluminium. Aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10.0% gave the highest number of positive reactions to aluminium.},
  author       = {Siemund, Ingrid and Zimerson, Erik and Hindsén, Monica and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {162--170},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Establishing aluminium contact allergy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02084.x},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2012},
}