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The need for oncogenetic counselling - Ten years' experience of a regional oncogenetic clinic

Henriksson, Karin LU ; Olsson, Håkan LU and Kristoffersson, Ulf LU (2004) In Acta Oncologica 43(7). p.637-649
Abstract
A monogenic inheritance, mainly seen as a dominant pattern, accounts for 5 - 10% of all cancer cases. The increased knowledge and identification of high-risk genes have led to a need for specialized cancer family clinic was the expression used by Eeles and Murday. The Oncogenetic Clinic at the University Hospital in Lund was started in 1993 and the authors' 10-year experience is summarized in this paper. The clinic offers service to the South Swedish Health Care Region comprising a total of 1.6 million inhabitants. During these first 10 years a total of 1 059 individuals from 789 families have been individually counselled. The most common reason for referral was a family history of breast cancer, followed by a family history of colorectal... (More)
A monogenic inheritance, mainly seen as a dominant pattern, accounts for 5 - 10% of all cancer cases. The increased knowledge and identification of high-risk genes have led to a need for specialized cancer family clinic was the expression used by Eeles and Murday. The Oncogenetic Clinic at the University Hospital in Lund was started in 1993 and the authors' 10-year experience is summarized in this paper. The clinic offers service to the South Swedish Health Care Region comprising a total of 1.6 million inhabitants. During these first 10 years a total of 1 059 individuals from 789 families have been individually counselled. The most common reason for referral was a family history of breast cancer, followed by a family history of colorectal cancer. According to the commonly used criteria, 437 (55%) of the families were considered as autosomal dominantly inherited; 147 families (19%) did not fulfil these criteria but had a strong clustering of breast/ovarian or colorectal/ endometrial cancer. The remaining 205 families (26%) were not recognized as any previously described hereditary cancer syndrome with early onset. However, most of these families had a family history of cancer. Mutation analysis was performed in 386/789 (49%) of the families. In families with breast and ovarian cancer a genetic aberration was identified in 45/76 (59%) and in breast-only families in 27/129 (21%). In MSI-positive colon cancer families 16/34 (47%) of the families had a germline mutation. Thus, the majority of the families referred to the clinic were in obvious need of genetic counselling concerning cancer and heredity and in a substantial number of the families a germline mutation could be identified. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oncologica
volume
43
issue
7
pages
637 - 649
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000224849000004
  • pmid:15545184
  • scopus:9444265972
ISSN
1651-226X
DOI
10.1080/02841860410018520
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
01c9e05e-1562-476a-b2e0-8d1bc67db26f (old id 262597)
date added to LUP
2007-10-26 15:58:34
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:55:27
@article{01c9e05e-1562-476a-b2e0-8d1bc67db26f,
  abstract     = {A monogenic inheritance, mainly seen as a dominant pattern, accounts for 5 - 10% of all cancer cases. The increased knowledge and identification of high-risk genes have led to a need for specialized cancer family clinic was the expression used by Eeles and Murday. The Oncogenetic Clinic at the University Hospital in Lund was started in 1993 and the authors' 10-year experience is summarized in this paper. The clinic offers service to the South Swedish Health Care Region comprising a total of 1.6 million inhabitants. During these first 10 years a total of 1 059 individuals from 789 families have been individually counselled. The most common reason for referral was a family history of breast cancer, followed by a family history of colorectal cancer. According to the commonly used criteria, 437 (55%) of the families were considered as autosomal dominantly inherited; 147 families (19%) did not fulfil these criteria but had a strong clustering of breast/ovarian or colorectal/ endometrial cancer. The remaining 205 families (26%) were not recognized as any previously described hereditary cancer syndrome with early onset. However, most of these families had a family history of cancer. Mutation analysis was performed in 386/789 (49%) of the families. In families with breast and ovarian cancer a genetic aberration was identified in 45/76 (59%) and in breast-only families in 27/129 (21%). In MSI-positive colon cancer families 16/34 (47%) of the families had a germline mutation. Thus, the majority of the families referred to the clinic were in obvious need of genetic counselling concerning cancer and heredity and in a substantial number of the families a germline mutation could be identified.},
  author       = {Henriksson, Karin and Olsson, Håkan and Kristoffersson, Ulf},
  issn         = {1651-226X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {637--649},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oncologica},
  title        = {The need for oncogenetic counselling - Ten years' experience of a regional oncogenetic clinic},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02841860410018520},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2004},
}