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Specific cysteine protease inhibitors act as deterrents of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in transgenic potato

Outchkourov, NS; de Kogel, WJ; Schuurman-de Bruin, A; Abrahamson, Magnus LU and Jongsma, MA (2004) In Plant Biotechnology Journal 2(5). p.439-448
Abstract
In this study, the effects of the accumulation of cysteine protease inhibitors on the food preferences of adult female western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), were investigated. Representative members of the cystatin and thyropin gene families (stefin A, cystatin C, kininogen domain 3 and equistatin) were expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Impala, Kondor and Line V plants. In choice assays, a strong time- and concentration-dependent deterrence from plants expressing stefin A and equistatin was observed. Cystatin C and kininogen domain 3 were not found to be active. All tested inhibitors were equally or more active than stefin A at inhibiting the proteolytic activity of thrips, but, in contrast with stefin A,... (More)
In this study, the effects of the accumulation of cysteine protease inhibitors on the food preferences of adult female western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), were investigated. Representative members of the cystatin and thyropin gene families (stefin A, cystatin C, kininogen domain 3 and equistatin) were expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Impala, Kondor and Line V plants. In choice assays, a strong time- and concentration-dependent deterrence from plants expressing stefin A and equistatin was observed. Cystatin C and kininogen domain 3 were not found to be active. All tested inhibitors were equally or more active than stefin A at inhibiting the proteolytic activity of thrips, but, in contrast with stefin A, they were all expressed in potato as partially degraded proteins. The resistance of cysteine protease inhibitors against degradation in planta by endogenous plant proteases may therefore be relevant in explaining the observed differences in the deterrence of thrips. The results demonstrate that, when given a choice, western flower thrips will select plants with low levels of certain cysteine protease inhibitors. The novel implications of the defensive role of plant cysteine protease inhibitors as both deterrents and antimetabolic proteins are discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
transgenic plants, thrips, protease inhibitor, Frankliniella occidentalis, insect resistance
in
Plant Biotechnology Journal
volume
2
issue
5
pages
439 - 448
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000223834300007
  • scopus:4544251201
ISSN
1467-7652
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-7652.2004.00088.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2453d397-f198-4e4d-941c-dabe84468ce1 (old id 267290)
date added to LUP
2007-10-29 13:39:50
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:38:18
@article{2453d397-f198-4e4d-941c-dabe84468ce1,
  abstract     = {In this study, the effects of the accumulation of cysteine protease inhibitors on the food preferences of adult female western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), were investigated. Representative members of the cystatin and thyropin gene families (stefin A, cystatin C, kininogen domain 3 and equistatin) were expressed in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Impala, Kondor and Line V plants. In choice assays, a strong time- and concentration-dependent deterrence from plants expressing stefin A and equistatin was observed. Cystatin C and kininogen domain 3 were not found to be active. All tested inhibitors were equally or more active than stefin A at inhibiting the proteolytic activity of thrips, but, in contrast with stefin A, they were all expressed in potato as partially degraded proteins. The resistance of cysteine protease inhibitors against degradation in planta by endogenous plant proteases may therefore be relevant in explaining the observed differences in the deterrence of thrips. The results demonstrate that, when given a choice, western flower thrips will select plants with low levels of certain cysteine protease inhibitors. The novel implications of the defensive role of plant cysteine protease inhibitors as both deterrents and antimetabolic proteins are discussed.},
  author       = {Outchkourov, NS and de Kogel, WJ and Schuurman-de Bruin, A and Abrahamson, Magnus and Jongsma, MA},
  issn         = {1467-7652},
  keyword      = {transgenic plants,thrips,protease inhibitor,Frankliniella occidentalis,insect resistance},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {439--448},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Plant Biotechnology Journal},
  title        = {Specific cysteine protease inhibitors act as deterrents of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in transgenic potato},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2004.00088.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2004},
}