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Engineered multidomain cysteine protease inhibitors yield resistance against western flower thrips (Franklinielia occidentalis) in greenhouse trials

Outchkourov, NS; de Kogel, WJ; Wiegers, GL; Abrahamson, Magnus LU and Jongsma, MA (2004) In Plant Biotechnology Journal 2(5). p.449-458
Abstract
Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripiclae), cause very large economic damage on a variety of field and greenhouse crops. In this study, plant resistance against thrips was introduced into transgenic potato plants through the expression of novel, custom-made, multiclomain protease inhibitors. Representative classes of inhibitors of cysteine and aspartic proteases [kininogen domain 3 (K), stefin A (A), cystatin C (C), potato cystatin (P) and equistatin (EIM)] were fused into reading frames consisting of four (K-A-C-P) to five (EIM-K-A-C-P) proteins, and were shown to fold into functional inhibitors in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The multiclomain proteins were expressed in potato and found to be... (More)
Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripiclae), cause very large economic damage on a variety of field and greenhouse crops. In this study, plant resistance against thrips was introduced into transgenic potato plants through the expression of novel, custom-made, multiclomain protease inhibitors. Representative classes of inhibitors of cysteine and aspartic proteases [kininogen domain 3 (K), stefin A (A), cystatin C (C), potato cystatin (P) and equistatin (EIM)] were fused into reading frames consisting of four (K-A-C-P) to five (EIM-K-A-C-P) proteins, and were shown to fold into functional inhibitors in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The multiclomain proteins were expressed in potato and found to be more resistant to degradation by plant proteases than the individual domains. In a time span of 14-16 days, transgenic potato plants expressing EIMKACP and KACP at a similar concentration reduced the number of larvae and adults to less than 20% of the control. Leaf damage on protected plants was minimal. Engineered multiclomain cysteine protease inhibitors thus provide a novel way of controlling western flower thrips in greenhouse and field crops, and open up possibilities for novel insect resistance applications in transgenic crops. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
protease inhibitor, Frankliniella occidentalis, insect resistance, thrips, transgenic plants
in
Plant Biotechnology Journal
volume
2
issue
5
pages
449 - 458
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000223834300008
  • scopus:4544362753
ISSN
1467-7652
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-7652.2004.00089.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
08e36d71-7510-4fe8-85f3-3659afd3adb0 (old id 267296)
date added to LUP
2007-10-29 13:41:28
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:36:04
@article{08e36d71-7510-4fe8-85f3-3659afd3adb0,
  abstract     = {Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripiclae), cause very large economic damage on a variety of field and greenhouse crops. In this study, plant resistance against thrips was introduced into transgenic potato plants through the expression of novel, custom-made, multiclomain protease inhibitors. Representative classes of inhibitors of cysteine and aspartic proteases [kininogen domain 3 (K), stefin A (A), cystatin C (C), potato cystatin (P) and equistatin (EIM)] were fused into reading frames consisting of four (K-A-C-P) to five (EIM-K-A-C-P) proteins, and were shown to fold into functional inhibitors in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The multiclomain proteins were expressed in potato and found to be more resistant to degradation by plant proteases than the individual domains. In a time span of 14-16 days, transgenic potato plants expressing EIMKACP and KACP at a similar concentration reduced the number of larvae and adults to less than 20% of the control. Leaf damage on protected plants was minimal. Engineered multiclomain cysteine protease inhibitors thus provide a novel way of controlling western flower thrips in greenhouse and field crops, and open up possibilities for novel insect resistance applications in transgenic crops.},
  author       = {Outchkourov, NS and de Kogel, WJ and Wiegers, GL and Abrahamson, Magnus and Jongsma, MA},
  issn         = {1467-7652},
  keyword      = {protease inhibitor,Frankliniella occidentalis,insect resistance,thrips,transgenic plants},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {449--458},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Plant Biotechnology Journal},
  title        = {Engineered multidomain cysteine protease inhibitors yield resistance against western flower thrips (Franklinielia occidentalis) in greenhouse trials},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2004.00089.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2004},
}