Advanced

Absorption of alpha-ketoglutarate by the gastrointestinal tract of pigs

Buddington, RK; Pajor, A; Buddington, KK and Pierzynowski, Stefan LU (2004) In Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A 138(2). p.215-220
Abstract
Only a small percentage of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administered lumenally to pigs appears in the portal circulation. This has been attributed to mucosal metabolism, and possibly by limited absorption. Although transporters for di- and tricarboxylic acids, which includes the sodium-dependent transporter NaDC-1, have been detected in the small intestine, correlations with functional assays are lacking. Therefore, intact tissues from three regions of the small intestine, stomach, and colon of weaned pigs were used to measure rates of AKG absorption. Western analysis was used to detect NaDC-1 in the three regions of small intestine. Rates of AKG absorption were highest in the small intestine, lowest in the colon, and intermediate in the... (More)
Only a small percentage of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administered lumenally to pigs appears in the portal circulation. This has been attributed to mucosal metabolism, and possibly by limited absorption. Although transporters for di- and tricarboxylic acids, which includes the sodium-dependent transporter NaDC-1, have been detected in the small intestine, correlations with functional assays are lacking. Therefore, intact tissues from three regions of the small intestine, stomach, and colon of weaned pigs were used to measure rates of AKG absorption. Western analysis was used to detect NaDC-1 in the three regions of small intestine. Rates of AKG absorption were highest in the small intestine, lowest in the colon, and intermediate in the stomach. Immunoreactive NaDC-1 was detected in the small intestine and this coincided with a component of AKG absorption that was inhibited by AKG and succinate. In contrast, absorption of AKG was inhibitable by unlabeled AKG, but not succinate, in the stomach, and by neither in the colon. Feeding studies indicated that the amounts of AKG that might be included in practical diets for pigs would not (1) upregulate rates of AKG absorption or (2) exceed estimated capacities of the small intestine to absorb AKG. The present findings indicate that the efficacy of AKG as an alternative metabolic fuel for enterocytes to spare dietary amino acids is not limited by absorption. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
transporter, stomach, small intestine, NaDC-1, dicarboxylic acid, colon, absorption, alpha-ketoglutarate
in
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A
volume
138
issue
2
pages
215 - 220
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000223255900011
  • pmid:15275656
  • scopus:3242740432
ISSN
1531-4332
DOI
10.1016/j.cbpb.2004.03.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
928343bf-b50d-43d9-8d5d-f47da6358bf2 (old id 270917)
date added to LUP
2007-08-02 11:13:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:58:10
@article{928343bf-b50d-43d9-8d5d-f47da6358bf2,
  abstract     = {Only a small percentage of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administered lumenally to pigs appears in the portal circulation. This has been attributed to mucosal metabolism, and possibly by limited absorption. Although transporters for di- and tricarboxylic acids, which includes the sodium-dependent transporter NaDC-1, have been detected in the small intestine, correlations with functional assays are lacking. Therefore, intact tissues from three regions of the small intestine, stomach, and colon of weaned pigs were used to measure rates of AKG absorption. Western analysis was used to detect NaDC-1 in the three regions of small intestine. Rates of AKG absorption were highest in the small intestine, lowest in the colon, and intermediate in the stomach. Immunoreactive NaDC-1 was detected in the small intestine and this coincided with a component of AKG absorption that was inhibited by AKG and succinate. In contrast, absorption of AKG was inhibitable by unlabeled AKG, but not succinate, in the stomach, and by neither in the colon. Feeding studies indicated that the amounts of AKG that might be included in practical diets for pigs would not (1) upregulate rates of AKG absorption or (2) exceed estimated capacities of the small intestine to absorb AKG. The present findings indicate that the efficacy of AKG as an alternative metabolic fuel for enterocytes to spare dietary amino acids is not limited by absorption.},
  author       = {Buddington, RK and Pajor, A and Buddington, KK and Pierzynowski, Stefan},
  issn         = {1531-4332},
  keyword      = {transporter,stomach,small intestine,NaDC-1,dicarboxylic acid,colon,absorption,alpha-ketoglutarate},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {215--220},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A},
  title        = {Absorption of alpha-ketoglutarate by the gastrointestinal tract of pigs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2004.03.007},
  volume       = {138},
  year         = {2004},
}